Regulations Amending the Wild Animal and Plant Trade Regulations: SOR/2020-179

Canada Gazette, Part II, Volume 154, Number 18

Registration

SOR/2020-179 August 25, 2020

WILD ANIMAL AND PLANT PROTECTION AND REGULATION OF INTERNATIONAL AND INTERPROVINCIAL TRADE ACT

P.C. 2020-572 August 23, 2020

Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to section 21footnote a of the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Actfootnote b, makes the annexed Regulations Amending the Wild Animal and Plant Trade Regulations.

Regulations Amending the Wild Animal and Plant Trade Regulations

Amendment

1 Schedule I to the Wild Animal and Plant Trade Regulationsfootnote 1 is replaced by the Schedule I set out in the schedule to these Regulations.

Coming into Force

2 These Regulations come into force on the day on which they are registered.

SCHEDULE

(Section 1)

SCHEDULE I

(Section 3, subsection 6(3), section 14, subsection 15(1) and section 20)

Animals Listed as Fauna and Plants Listed as Flora in the Appendices to the Convention

1 The following definitions apply in this Schedule:

2 Species that are included in the Appendices to the Convention and specified in this Schedule are referred to

3 The abbreviation “spp.” is used to denote all species of a higher taxon.

4 The following abbreviations are used to denote plant taxa below the level of species:

5 Hybrid animals that have in their recent lineage at least one specimen of species included in Appendix I or II to the Convention are subject to the provisions of the Convention just as if they were full species, even if the hybrid concerned is not specifically included in the Appendices to the Convention. If at least one of the animals in the recent lineage is of a species included in Appendix I to the Convention, the hybrids are treated as specimens of species included in Appendix I. If at least one of the animals in the recent lineage is of a species included in Appendix II to the Convention and no specimens in that lineage are included in Appendix I, the hybrids are treated as specimens of species included in Appendix II. For the purposes of this section, recent lineage means the last four generations.

6 Because none of the species or higher taxa of FLORA (plants) included in Appendix I to the Convention is annotated to the effect that their hybrids are treated in accordance with the provisions of Article III of the Convention, artificially propagated hybrids produced from one or more of these species or taxa may be traded with a certificate of artificial propagation, and seeds and pollen (including pollinia), cut flowers, seedlings or tissue cultures of these hybrids that are obtained in vitro, in solid or liquid media, and are transported in sterile containers, are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.

7 Other references to taxa higher than species are for the purposes of information or classification only.

8 Only the Latin scientific nomenclature has legal status in this Schedule. The English and French common names are included for reference only. The Latin scientific nomenclature is based on the Checklist of CITES Species, compiled by the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, as amended from time to time. The Checklist has been adopted by the Conference of the Parties in Resolution Conf. 12.11 as an official digest of scientific names contained in the standard CITES references for species included in the Appendices to the Convention and also provides common names, where available, of animals and plants.

9 The names of the countries listed in column III of Parts I or II of this Schedule are those of the Parties to the Convention that submitted the species or their national population of the species for inclusion in Appendix III to the Convention.

10 When a species is included in one of the Appendices to the Convention, all parts and derivatives of the species are also included in the same Appendix unless the species is annotated to indicate that only specific parts and derivatives are included. The symbol “#” followed by a number placed against the name of a species or higher taxon included in Appendix II or III to the Convention refers to a footnote to Part II of this Schedule that indicates the parts or derivatives of plants that are designated as “specimens” subject to the provisions of the Convention in accordance with subparagraph (b)(iii) of Article I.

PART I
Fauna

Item

Column I

Regulated Taxa

Column II

Appendix to the Convention

Column III

Listing Country

Column IV

English Common Name

Column V

French Common Name

1.0.0.0

CHORDATA

       

1.1.0.0

MAMMALIA

       

1.1.1.0

ARTIODACTYLA

       

1.1.1.1

Antilocapridae

       
 

(1) Antilocapra americana

(Only the population of Mexico; no other population is included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

I

 

Mexican pronghorn antelope

Antilope à fourche du Mexique

1.1.1.2

Bovidae

       
 

(1) Addax nasomaculatus

I

 

Addax

Addax à nez tacheté

 

(2) Ammotragus lervia

II

 

Barbary sheep

Aoudad

 

(3) Antilope cervicapra

III

Nepal, Pakistan

Blackbuck antelope

Antilope cervicapre

 

(4) Bos gaurus

(Except the domesticated form, referenced as Bos frontalis, which is not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

I

 

Gaur

Gaur

 

(5) Bos mutus

(Except the domesticated form, referenced as Bos grunniens, which is not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

I

 

Wild yak

Yack sauvage

 

(6) Bos sauveli

I

 

Kouprey

Kouprey

 

(7) Boselaphus tragocamelus

III

Pakistan

Nilgai

Nilgaut

 

(8) Bubalus arnee

(Except the domesticated form, referenced as Bubalus bubalis, which is not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

III

Nepal

Wild Asiatic buffalo

Buffle sauvage d’Asie

 

(9) Bubalus depressicornis

I

 

Lowland anoa

Anoa des plaines

 

(10) Bubalus mindorensis

I

 

Tamaraw

Tamarau

 

(11) Bubalus quarlesi

I

 

Mountain anoa

Anoa des montagnes

 

(12) Budorcas taxicolor

II

 

Takin

Takin

 

(13) Capra caucasica

II

 

Western tur

Bouquetin du Caucase

 

(14) Capra falconeri

I

 

Markhor

Markhor

 

(15) Capra hircus aegagrus

(Except the domesticated form, which is not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

III

Pakistan

Goat

Chèvre

 

(16) Capra sibirica

III

Pakistan

Siberian ibex

Ibex de Sibérie

 

(17) Capricornis milneedwardsii

I

 

Chinese serow

Capricorne de Milneedwards

 

(18) Capricornis rubidus

I

 

Red serow

Capricorne rouge

 

(19) Capricornis sumatraensis

I

 

Sumatra serow

Capricorne de Sumatra

 

(20) Capricornis thar

I

 

Himalayan serow

Capricorne de l’Himalaya

 

(21) Cephalophus brookei

II

 

Duiker

Céphalophe

 

(22) Cephalophus dorsalis

II

 

Bay duiker

Céphalophe à bande dorsale noire

 

(23) Cephalophus jentinki

I

 

Jentink’s duiker

Céphalophe de Jentink

 

(24) Cephalophus ogilbyi

II

 

Ogilby’s duiker

Céphalophe d’Ogilby

 

(25) Cephalophus silvicultor

II

 

Yellow-backed duiker

Céphalophe à dos jaune

 

(26) Cephalophus zebra

II

 

Zebra antelope

Céphalophe zébré

 

(27) Damaliscus pygargus pygargus

II

 

Bontebok

Bontebok

 

(28) Gazella bennettii

III

Pakistan

Indian gazelle

Gazelle d’Asie du Sud

 

(29) Gazella cuvieri

I

 

Mountain gazelle

Edmi

 

(30) Gazella dorcas

III

Algeria, Tunisia

Dorcas gazelle

Dorcas

 

(31) Gazella leptoceros

I

 

Slender-horned gazelle

Gazelle à cornes grêles

 

(32) Hippotragus niger variani

I

 

Giant sable antelope

Hippotrague noir géant

 

(33) Kobus leche

II

 

Lechwe

Lechwe

 

(34) Naemorhedus baileyi

I

 

Red goral

Goral rouge

 

(35) Naemorhedus caudatus

I

 

Long-tailed goral

Goral à queue longue

 

(36) Naemorhedus goral

I

 

Himalayan goral

Bouquetin du Népal

 

(37) Naemorhedus griseus

I

 

Chinese goral

Goral de Chine

 

(38) Nanger dama

I

 

Dama gazelle

Gazelle dama

 

(39) Oryx dammah

I

 

Scimitar-horned oryx

Oryx algazelle

 

(40) Oryx leucoryx

I

 

Arabian oryx

Oryx d’Arabie

 

(41) Ovis ammon

II

 

Argali sheep

Argali

 

(42) Ovis arabica

II

 

Arabian wild sheep

Mouflon

 

(43) Ovis bochariensis

II

 

Bukhara urial

Mouflon

 

(44) Ovis canadensis

(Only the population of Mexico; no other population is included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Bighorn sheep

Mouflon d’Amérique

 

(45) Ovis collium

II

 

Kazakhstan argali

Mouflon

 

(46) Ovis cycloceros

II

 

Afghan urial

Mouflon

 

(47) Ovis darwini

II

 

Gobi argali

Mouflon

 

(48) Ovis gmelini

(Only the population of Cyprus; no other population is included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

I

 

Cyprian mouflon

Mouflon de Chypre

 

(49) Ovis hodgsoni

I

 

Tibetan argali

Mouflon des montagnes

 

(50) Ovis jubata

II

 

Shansi argali

Mouflon

 

(51) Ovis karelini

II

 

Tianshan argali

Mouflon

 

(52) Ovis nigrimontana

I

 

Kara Tau argali

Mouflon du Kazakhstan

 

(53) Ovis polii

II

 

Marco Polo argali

Mouflon

 

(54) Ovis punjabiensis

II

   

Mouflon

 

(55) Ovis severtzovi

II

 

Severtzov’s argali

Mouflon

 

(56) Ovis vignei

I

 

Ladakh urial

Mouflon de Ladak

 

(57) Pantholops hodgsonii

I

 

Tibetan antelope

Antilope du Tibet

 

(58) Philantomba monticola

II

 

Blue duiker

Céphalophe bleu

 

(59) Pseudois nayaur

III

Pakistan

Himalayan blue sheep

Mouton bleu de l’Himalaya

 

(60) Pseudoryx nghetinhensis

I

 

Vu quang ox

Saola

 

(61) Rupicapra pyrenaica ornata

II

 

Abruzzi chamois

Chamois des Abruzzes

 

(62) Saiga borealis

(A zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Mongolian saiga

Saiga de Mongolie

 

(63) Saiga tatarica

(A zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Saiga antelope

Saiga

 

(64) Tetracerus quadricornis

III

Nepal

Four-horned antelope

Tétracère

1.1.1.3

Camelidae

       
 

(1) Lama guanicoe

II

 

Guanaco

Guanaco

 

(2) Vicugna vicugna

(Except the populations of: Argentina [the populations of the provinces of Jujuy, Catamarca and Salta and the semi-captive populations of the provinces of Jujuy, Salta, Catamarca, La Rioja and San Juan], Chile [populations of the region of Tarapacá and of the region of Arica and Parinacota], Ecuador [the whole population], Peru [the whole population] and the Plurinational State of Bolivia [the whole population], which are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Vicugna

Vigogne

 

(3) Vicugna vicugna

(Only the populations of Argentina [the populations of the provinces of Jujuy, Catamarca and Salta and the semi-captive populations of the provinces of Jujuy, Salta, Catamarca, La Rioja and San Juan], Chile [populations of the region of Tarapacá and of the region of Arica and Parinacota], Ecuador [the whole population], Peru [the whole population] and the Plurinational State of Bolivia [the whole population]; all other populations are included in Appendix I to the Convention.1)

II

 

Vicugna

Vigogne

1.1.1.4

Cervidae

       
 

(1) Axis calamianensis

I

 

Calamian deer

Cerf calamian

 

(2) Axis kuhlii

I

 

Bawean Kuhl’s deer

Cerf de Kuhl

 

(3) Axis porcinus

(Except the subspecies included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

III

Pakistan

Indian hog deer

Cerf cochon

 

(4) Axis porcinus annamiticus

I

 

Ganges hog deer

Cerf cochon du Gange

 

(5) Blastocerus dichotomus

I

 

Marsh deer

Cerf des marais

 

(6) Cervus elaphus bactrianus

II

 

Bactrian red deer

Cerf rouge du Turkestan

 

(7) Cervus elaphus barbarus

III

Algeria, Tunisia

Barbary deer

Cerf rouge

 

(8) Cervus elaphus hanglu

I

 

Kashmir stag

Cerf du Cachemire

 

(9) Dama dama mesopotamica

I

 

Persian fallow deer

Daim persan

 

(10) Hippocamelus spp.

I

 

Andean deers

Cerfs des Andes

 

(11) Mazama temama cerasina

III

Guatemala

Red brocket deer

Daguet rouge

 

(12) Muntiacus crinifrons

I

 

Black muntjac

Muntjac noir

 

(13) Muntiacus vuquangensis

I

 

Giant muntjac

Muntjac géant

 

(14) Odocoileus virginianus mayensis

III

Guatemala

Guatemalan white-tailed deer

Cerf à queue blanche du Guatemala

 

(15) Ozotoceros bezoarticus

I

 

Pampas deer

Cerf des Pampas

 

(16) Pudu mephistophiles

II

 

Northern pudu

Pudu du Nord

 

(17) Pudu puda

I

 

Chilean pudu

Pudu du Sud

 

(18) Rucervus duvaucelii

I

 

Barasingha

Barasinga

 

(19) Rucervus eldii

I

 

Eld’s deer

Cerf d’Eld

1.1.1.5

Giraffidae

       
 

(1) Giraffa camelopardalis

II

 

Giraffe

Girafe

1.1.1.6

Hippopotamidae

       
 

(1) Hexaprotodon liberiensis

II

 

Pygmy hippopotamus

Hippopotame nain

 

(2) Hippopotamus amphibius

II

 

Hippopotamus

Hippopotame amphibie

1.1.1.7

Moschidae

       
 

(1) Moschus spp.

(Only the populations of Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Musk deer

Porte-musc

 

(2) Moschus spp.

(Except the populations of Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan, which are included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Musk deer

Porte-musc

1.1.1.8

Suidae

       
 

(1) Babyrousa babyrussa

I

 

Babirusa

Babiroussa

 

(2) Babyrousa bolabatuensis

I

 

Bola Batu babirusa

Babiroussa des Célèbes

 

(3) Babyrousa celebensis

I

 

North Sulawesi babirusa

Babiroussa des Célèbes

 

(4) Babyrousa togeanensis

I

 

Malenge babirusa

Babiroussa de l’île Togian

 

(5) Sus salvanius

I

 

Pygmy hog

Sanglier nain

1.1.1.9

Tayassuidae

       
 

(1) Tayassuidae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention and the populations of Pecari tajacu of Mexico and the United States of America, which are not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Peccaries

Pécaris

 

(2) Catagonus wagneri

I

 

Giant peccary

Pécari géant

1.1.2.0

CARNIVORA

       

1.1.2.1

Ailuridae

       
 

(1) Ailurus fulgens

I

 

Red panda

Petit panda

1.1.2.2

Canidae

       
 

(1) Canis aureus

III

India

Golden jackal

Chacal commun

 

(2) Canis lupus

(Only the populations of Bhutan, India, Nepal and Pakistan; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention. Excludes the domesticated form and the dingo, which are referenced as Canis lupus familiaris and Canis lupus dingo, respectively, which are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

I

 

Wolf

Loup

 

(3) Canis lupus

(Except for the populations of Bhutan, India, Nepal and Pakistan, which are included in Appendix I to the Convention. Also excludes the domesticated form and the dingo, which are referenced as Canis lupus familiaris and Canis lupus dingo, respectively, which are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

II

 

Wolf

Loup

 

(4) Cerdocyon thous

II

 

Forest fox

Renard crabier

 

(5) Chrysocyon brachyurus

II

 

Maned wolf

Loup à crinière

 

(6) Cuon alpinus

II

 

Asiatic wild dog

Chien sauvage d’Asie

 

(7) Lycalopex culpaeus

II

 

South American fox

Renard Colfeo

 

(8) Lycalopex fulvipes

II

 

Darwin’s fox

Renard de Darwin

 

(9) Lycalopex griseus

II

 

Argentine grey fox

Renard gris de l’Argentine

 

(10) Lycalopex gymnocercus

II

 

Pampas fox

Renard d’Azara

 

(11) Speothos venaticus

I

 

Bush dog

Chien des buissons

 

(12) Vulpes bengalensis

III

India

Bengal fox

Renard du Bengale

 

(13) Vulpes cana

II

 

Afghan fox

Renard d’Afghanistan

 

(14) Vulpes vulpes griffithi

III

India

Kashmir fox

Renard roux

 

(15) Vulpes vulpes montana

III

India

Tibetan fox

Renard roux

 

(16) Vulpes vulpes pusilla

III

India

Little red fox

Renard roux

 

(17) Vulpes zerda

II

 

Fennec fox

Fennec

1.1.2.3

Eupleridae

       
 

(1) Cryptoprocta ferox

II

 

Fossa

Foussa

 

(2) Eupleres goudotii

II

 

Slender falanouc

Euplère de Goudot

 

(3) Fossa fossana

II

 

Fanaloka

Civette fossane

1.1.2.4

Felidae

       
 

(1) Felidae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention. Specimens of the domesticated form are not subject to the provisions of the Convention. For Panthera leo (African populations): a zero annual export quota is established for specimens of bones, bone pieces, bone products, claws, skeletons, skulls and teeth removed from the wild and traded for commercial purposes. Annual export quotas for trade in bones, bone pieces, bone products, claws, skeletons, skulls and teeth for commercial purposes, derived from captive breeding operations in South Africa, will be established and communicated annually to the Secretariat.)

II

 

Cats

Félidés, chats

 

(2) Acinonyx jubatus

(Annual export quotas for live specimens and hunting trophies are granted as follows: Botswana: 5; Namibia: 150; Zimbabwe: 50. The trade in such specimens is subject to the provisions of Article III of the Convention.)

I

 

Cheetah

Guépard

 

(3) Caracal caracal

(Only the population of Asia; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Caracal

Caracal

 

(4) Catopuma temminckii

I

 

Asiatic golden cat

Chat doré d’Asie

 

(5) Felis nigripes

I

 

Black-footed cat

Chat à pieds noirs

 

(6) Herpailurus yagouaroundi

(Only the populations of Central and North America; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Jaguarundi

Jaguarundi

 

(7) Leopardus geoffroyi

I

 

Geoffroy’s cat

Chat de Geoffroy

 

(8) Leopardus guttulus

I

 

Southern tigrina

Chat-tigre

 

(9) Leopardus jacobita

I

 

Andean cat

Chat des Andes

 

(10) Leopardus pardalis

I

 

Ocelot

Ocelot

 

(11) Leopardus tigrinus

I

 

Little spotted cat

Chat-tigre tacheté

 

(12) Leopardus wiedii

I

 

Margay

Margay

 

(13) Lynx pardinus

I

 

Spanish lynx

Lynx d’Espagne

 

(14) Neofelis diardi

I

 

Sunda Clouded leopard

Panthère nébuleuse

 

(15) Neofelis nebulosa

I

 

Clouded leopard

Panthère longibande

 

(16) Panthera leo

(Only the populations of India; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Asiatic lion

Lion d’Asie

 

(17) Panthera onca

I

 

Jaguar

Jaguar

 

(18) Panthera pardus

I

 

Leopard

Léopard

 

(19) Panthera tigris

I

 

Tiger

Tigre

 

(20) Panthera uncia

I

 

Snow leopard

Léopard des neiges

 

(21) Pardofelis marmorata

I

 

Marbled cat

Chat marbré

 

(22) Prionailurus bengalensis bengalensis

(Only the populations of Bangladesh, India and Thailand; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Leopard cat

Chat-léopard

 

(23) Prionailurus planiceps

I

 

Flat-headed cat

Chat à tête plate

 

(24) Prionailurus rubiginosus

(Only the population of India; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Rusty-spotted cat

Chat rougeâtre

 

(25) Puma concolor

(Only the populations of Costa Rica and Panama; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Central American puma

Puma d’Amérique centrale

1.1.2.5

Herpestidae

       
 

(1) Herpestes edwardsi

III

India, Pakistan

Indian gray mongoose

Mangouste d’Edwards

 

(2) Herpestes fuscus

III

India

Indian brown mongoose

Mangouste brune de l’Inde

 

(3) Herpestes javanicus

III

Pakistan

Small Asian mongoose

Petite mangouste indienne

 

(4) Herpestes javanicus auropunctatus

III

India

Gold-spotted mongoose

Mangouste tachetée de l’Inde

 

(5) Herpestes smithii

III

India

Ruddy mongoose

Mangouste vermeille

 

(6) Herpestes urva

III

India

Crab-eating mongoose

Mangouste crabière

 

(7) Herpestes vitticollis

III

India

Stripe-necked mongoose

Mangouste à cou rayé

1.1.2.6

Hyaenidae

       
 

(1) Hyaena hyaena

III

Pakistan

Striped hyena

Hyène rayée

 

(2) Proteles cristata

III

Botswana

Aardwolf

Loup fouisseur

1.1.2.7

Mephitidae

       
 

(1) Conepatus humboldtii

II

 

Patagonian skunk

Mouffette de Patagonie

1.1.2.8

Mustelidae (Lutrinae)

       
 

(1) Lutrinae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Otters

Loutres

 

(2) Aonyx capensis microdon

(Only the populations of Cameroon and Nigeria; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Small-toothed clawless otter

Loutre à joues blanches du Cameroun

 

(3) Aonyx cinerea

I

 

Small-clawed otter

Loutre cendrée

 

(4) Enhydra lutris nereis

I

 

Southern sea otter

Loutre de mer méridionale

 

(5) Lontra felina

I

 

Marine otter

Loutre de mer

 

(6) Lontra longicaudis

I

 

Chilean otter

Loutre à longue queue

 

(7) Lontra provocax

I

 

Chilean river otter

Loutre du Chili

 

(8) Lutra lutra

I

 

European otter

Loutre commune

 

(9) Lutra nippon

I

 

Japanese otter

Loutre japonaise

 

(10) Lutrogale perspicillata

I

 

Smooth-coated otter

Loutre d’Asie

 

(11) Pteronura brasiliensis

I

 

Giant otter

Loutre géante

1.1.2.9

Mustelidae (Mustelinae)

       
 

(1) Eira barbara

III

Honduras

Tayra

Tayra

 

(2) Martes flavigula

III

India

Yellow-throated South Indian marten

Martre à gorge jaune de l’Inde du Sud

 

(3) Martes foina intermedia

III

India

Beech marten

Martre fouine

 

(4) Martes gwatkinsii

III

India

Nilgiri marten

Martre de l’Inde du Sud

 

(5) Mellivora capensis

III

Botswana

Ratel

Ratel

 

(6) Mustela altaica

III

India

Mountain weasel

Belette de montagne

 

(7) Mustela erminea ferghanae

III

India

Ermine

Hermine

 

(8) Mustela kathiah

III

India

Yellow-bellied weasel

Belette à ventre jaune

 

(9) Mustela nigripes

I

 

Black-footed ferret

Putois à pieds noirs

 

(10) Mustela sibirica

III

India

Siberian weasel

Belette de Sibérie

1.1.2.10

Odobenidae

       
 

(1) Odobenus rosmarus

III

Canada

Walrus

Morse

1.1.2.11

Otariidae

       
 

(1) Arctocephalus spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Southern fur seals

Otaries à fourrure australe

 

(2) Arctocephalus townsendi

I

 

Guadalupe fur seal

Otarie à fourrure d’Amérique

1.1.2.12

Phocidae

       
 

(1) Mirounga leonina

II

 

Southern elephant seal

Éléphant de mer du Sud

 

(2) Monachus spp.

I

 

Monk seals

Phoques-moines

1.1.2.13

Procyonidae

       
 

(1) Nasua narica

III

Honduras

White-nosed coati

Coati à museau blanc

 

(2) Nasua nasua solitaria

III

Uruguay

Coatimundi

Coati de montagne

 

(3) Potos flavus

III

Honduras

Kinkajou

Poto

1.1.2.14

Ursidae

       
 

(1) Ursidae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Bears

Ours

 

(2) Ailuropoda melanoleuca

I

 

Giant panda

Panda géant

 

(3) Helarctos malayanus

I

 

Sun bear

Ours malais

 

(4) Melursus ursinus

I

 

Sloth bear

Ours de l’Inde

 

(5) Tremarctos ornatus

I

 

Spectacled bear

Ours à lunettes

 

(6) Ursus arctos

(Only the populations of Bhutan, China, Mexico and Mongolia; all other populations are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Grizzly

Grizzli

 

(7) Ursus arctos isabellinus

I

 

Himalayan brown bear

Ours brun

 

(8) Ursus thibetanus

I

 

Himalayan black bear

Ours à collier

1.1.2.15

Viverridae

       
 

(1) Arctictis binturong

III

India

Binturong

Binturong

 

(2) Civettictis civetta

III

Botswana

African civet

Civette d’Afrique

 

(3) Cynogale bennettii

II

 

Otter civet

Civette-loutre de Sumatra

 

(4) Hemigalus derbyanus

II

 

Banded palm civet

Civette palmiste à bandes

 

(5) Paguma larvata

III

India

Masked palm civet

Civette palmiste à masque

 

(6) Paradoxurus hermaphroditus

III

India

Common palm civet

Civette palmiste hermaphrodite

 

(7) Paradoxurus jerdoni

III

India

Jerdon’s palm civet

Civette palmiste de Jerdon

 

(8) Prionodon linsang

II

 

Banded linsang

Linsang à bandes

 

(9) Prionodon pardicolor

I

 

Spotted linsang

Linsang tacheté

 

(10) Viverra civettina

III

India

Large spotted civet

Civette à grandes taches

 

(11) Viverra zibetha

III

India

Large Indian civet

Grande civette de l’Inde

 

(12) Viverricula indica

III

India

Small Indian civet

Civette de l’Inde

1.1.3.0

CETACEA

       
 

(1) CETACEA spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention. A zero annual export quota has been established for live specimens from the Black Sea population of Tursiops truncatus removed from the wild and traded for primarily commercial purposes.)

II

 

Whales, dolphins, porpoises

Baleines, dauphins, marsouins

1.1.3.1

Balaenidae

       
 

(1) Balaena mysticetus

I

 

Bowhead whale

Baleine boréale

 

(2) Eubalaena spp.

I

 

Right whales

Baleines franches

1.1.3.2

Balaenopteridae

       
 

(1) Balaenoptera acutorostrata

(Except the population of West Greenland, which is included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Minke whale

Petit rorqual

 

(2) Balaenoptera bonaerensis

I

 

Antarctic minke whale

Petit rorqual

 

(3) Balaenoptera borealis

I

 

Sei whale

Rorqual boréal

 

(4) Balaenoptera edeni

I

 

Bryde’s whale

Balénoptère de Bryde

 

(5) Balaenoptera musculus

I

 

Blue whale

Rorqual bleu

 

(6) Balaenoptera omurai

I

 

Omura’s whale

Rorqual d’Omura

 

(7) Balaenoptera physalus

I

 

Fin whale

Rorqual commun

 

(8) Megaptera novaeangliae

I

 

Humpback whale

Rorqual à bosse

1.1.3.3

Delphinidae

       
 

(1) Orcaella brevirostris

I

 

Irrawaddy dolphin

Orcelle

 

(2) Orcaella heinsohni

I

 

Australian snubfin dolphin

Dauphin à aileron retroussé d’Australie

 

(3) Sotalia spp.

I

 

White dolphins

Dauphins blancs

 

(4) Sousa spp.

I

 

Humpback dolphins

Dauphins à bosse

1.1.3.4

Eschrichtiidae

       
 

(1) Eschrichtius robustus

I

 

Gray whale

Baleine grise

1.1.3.5

Iniidae

       
 

(1) Lipotes vexillifer

I

 

Chinese river dolphin

Dauphin d’eau douce de Chine

1.1.3.6

Neobalaenidae

       
 

(1) Caperea marginata

I

 

Pygmy right whale

Baleine franche naine

1.1.3.7

Phocoenidae

       
 

(1) Neophocaena asiaeorientalis

I

 

Narrow-ridged finless porpoise

Marsouin aptère

 

(2) Neophocaena phocaenoides

I

 

Black finless porpoise

Marsouin noir

 

(3) Phocoena sinus

I

 

Gulf of California harbour porpoise

Marsouin du Pacifique

1.1.3.8

Physeteridae

       
 

(1) Physeter macrocephalus

I

 

Sperm whale

Cachalot macrocéphale

1.1.3.9

Platanistidae

       
 

(1) Platanista spp.

I

 

Ganges dolphins

Dauphins du Gange

1.1.3.10

Ziphiidae

       
 

(1) Berardius spp.

I

 

Giant bottlenose whales

Grandes baleines à bec

 

(2) Hyperoodon spp.

I

 

Bottlenose whales

Baleines à bec

1.1.4.0

CHIROPTERA

       

1.1.4.1

Phyllostomidae

       
 

(1) Platyrrhinus lineatus

III

Uruguay

White-lined bat

Sténoderme pseudo-vampire

1.1.4.2

Pteropodidae

       
 

(1) Acerodon spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Flying foxes

Roussettes

 

(2) Acerodon jubatus

I

 

Golden-capped fruit bat

Roussette à couronne dorée

 

(3) Pteropus spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention and Pteropus brunneus, which is not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Flying foxes

Roussettes

 

(4) Pteropus insularis

I

 

Truk flying fox

Roussette des îles Truk

 

(5) Pteropus loochoensis

I

 

Japanese flying fox

Roussette d’Okinawa

 

(6) Pteropus mariannus

I

 

Marianas flying fox

Roussette des îles Mariannes

 

(7) Pteropus molossinus

I

 

Ponape flying fox

Roussette de Ponape

 

(8) Pteropus pelewensis

I

 

Palau flying fox

Roussette des Palaos

 

(9) Pteropus pilosus

I

 

Large Palau flying fox

Roussette des Palaos

 

(10) Pteropus samoensis

I

 

Samoan flying fox

Roussette des îles Samoa

 

(11) Pteropus tonganus

I

 

Insular flying fox

Roussette des îles Tonga

 

(12) Pteropus ualanus

I

 

Kosrae flying fox

Roussette de Kosrae

 

(13) Pteropus yapensis

I

 

Yap flying fox

Roussette de Yap

1.1.5.0

CINGULATA

       

1.1.5.1

Dasypodidae

       
 

(1) Cabassous tatouay

III

Uruguay

Naked-tailed armadillo

Tatou à queue nue

 

(2) Chaetophractus nationi

(A zero annual export quota has been established. All specimens are deemed to be specimens of species included in Appendix I to the Convention and the trade in them is regulated accordingly.)

II

 

Hairy armadillo

Tatou

 

(3) Priodontes maximus

I

 

Giant armadillo

Tatou géant

1.1.6.0

DASYUROMORPHIA

       

1.1.6.1

Dasyuridae

       
 

(1) Sminthopsis longicaudata

I

 

Long-tailed marsupial-mouse

Souris marsupiale à longue queue

 

(2) Sminthopsis psammophila

I

 

Large desert marsupial-mouse

Souris marsupiale du désert

1.1.7.0

DIPROTODONTIA

       

1.1.7.1

Macropodidae

       
 

(1) Dendrolagus inustus

II

 

Grizzled tree kangaroo

Kangourou arboricole gris

 

(2) Dendrolagus ursinus

II

 

Black tree kangaroo

Kangourou arboricole noir

 

(3) Lagorchestes hirsutus

I

 

Western hare-wallaby

Wallaby-lièvre de l’ouest

 

(4) Lagostrophus fasciatus

I

 

Banded hare-wallaby

Wallaby-lièvre rayé

 

(5) Onychogalea fraenata

I

 

Bridled nail-tailed wallaby

Wallaby bridé

1.1.7.2

Phalangeridae

       
 

(1) Phalanger intercastellanus

II

 

Eastern common cuscus

Couscous commun de l’Est

 

(2) Phalanger mimicus

II

 

Cryptic cuscus

Couscous commun du Sud

 

(3) Phalanger orientalis

II

 

Grey cuscus

Couscous gris

 

(4) Spilocuscus kraemeri

II

 

Admiralty cuscus

Couscous de l’ïle de l’Amirauté

 

(5) Spilocuscus maculatus

II

 

Spotted cuscus

Couscous tacheté

 

(6) Spilocuscus papuensis

II

 

Waigeo cuscus

Couscous Waigeou

1.1.7.3

Potoroidae

       
 

(1) Bettongia spp.

I

 

Rat-kangaroos

Bettongies

1.1.7.4

Vombatidae

       
 

(1) Lasiorhinus krefftii

I

 

Queensland hairy-nosed wombat

Wombat à nez poilu

1.1.8.0

LAGOMORPHA

       

1.1.8.1

Leporidae

       
 

(1) Caprolagus hispidus

I

 

Hispid Assam rabbit

Lapin de l’Assam

 

(2) Romerolagus diazi

I

 

Volcano rabbit

Lapin des volcans

1.1.9.0

MONOTREMATA

       

1.1.9.1

Tachyglossidae

       
 

(1) Zaglossus spp.

II

 

Long-nosed spiny anteaters

Échidnés à bec courbé

1.1.10.0

PERAMELEMORPHIA

       

1.1.10.1

Peramelidae

       
 

(1) Perameles bougainville

I

 

Western barred-bandicoot

Bandicoot de Bougainville

1.1.10.2

Thylacomyidae

       
 

(1) Macrotis lagotis

I

 

Greater rabbit-eared bandicoot

Grand bandicoot-lapin

1.1.11.0

PERISSODACTYLA

       

1.1.11.1

Equidae

       
 

(1) Equus africanus

(Except the domesticated form, referenced as Equus asinus, which is not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

I

 

African wild ass

Âne sauvage de l’Afrique

 

(2) Equus grevyi

I

 

Grevy’s zebra

Zèbre de Grevy

 

(3) Equus hemionus

(Except the subspecies included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Asiatic wild ass

Hémippe

 

(4) Equus hemionus hemionus

I

 

Mongolian wild ass

Âne sauvage de Mongolie

 

(5) Equus hemionus khur

I

 

Indian wild ass

Âne sauvage de l’Inde

 

(6) Equus kiang

II

 

Kiang

Âne sauvage du Tibet

 

(7) Equus przewalskii

I

 

Przewalski’s horse

Cheval de Przewalski

 

(8) Equus zebra hartmannae

II

 

Hartman’s mountain zebra

Zèbre de montagne

 

(9) Equus zebra zebra

II

 

Cape Mountain zebra

Zèbre de montagne du Cap

1.1.11.2

Rhinocerotidae

       
 

(1) Rhinocerotidae spp.

(Except the subspecies included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Rhinoceroses

Rhinocéros

 

(2) Ceratotherium simum simum

(Only the populations of Eswatini and South Africa; all other populations are included in Appendix I to the Convention. For the exclusive purpose of allowing international trade in live animals to appropriate and acceptable destinations and in hunting trophies. All other specimens are deemed to be specimens of species included in Appendix I to the Convention, and the trade in them is regulated accordingly.)

II

 

Southern white rhinoceros

Rhinocéros blanc du Sud

1.1.11.3

Tapiridae

       
 

(1) Tapiridae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Tapirs

Tapirs

 

(2) Tapirus terrestris

II

 

Brazilian tapir

Tapir d’Amérique

1.1.12.0

PHOLIDOTA

       

1.1.12.1

Manidae

       
 

(1) Manis spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Pangolins

Pangolins

 

(2) Manis crassicaudata

I

 

Indian pangolin

Grand pangolin de l’Inde, Pangolin à grosse queue

 

(3) Manis culionensis

I

 

Philippine pangolin

Pangolin des Philippines

 

(4) Manis gigantea

I

 

Giant pangolin

Pangolin géant, Grand pangolin

 

(5) Manis javanica

I

 

Sunda pangolin

Pangolin malais, Pangolin javanais

 

(6) Manis pentadactyla

I

 

Chinese pangolin

Pangolin de Chine, Pangolin à queue courte

 

(7) Manis temminckii

I

 

South African pangolin

Pangolin de Temminck, Pangolin terrestre du Cap

 

(8) Manis tetradactyla

I

 

Long-tailed pangolin

Pangolin à longue queue, Pangolin tétradactyle

 

(9) Manis tricuspis

I

 

White-bellied pangolin

Pangolin à écailles tricuspides, Pangolin commun

1.1.13.0

PILOSA

       

1.1.13.1

Bradypodidae

       
 

(1) Bradypus pygmaeus

II

 

Pygmy three-toed sloth

Paresseux nain

 

(2) Bradypus variegatus

II

 

Bolivian three-toed sloth

Paresseux tridactyle de Bolivie

1.1.13.2

Myrmecophagidae

       
 

(1) Myrmecophaga tridactyla

II

 

Giant anteater

Grand fourmilier

 

(2) Tamandua mexicana

III

Guatemala

Northern Tamandua

Fourmilier à collier

1.1.14.0

PRIMATES

       
 

(1) PRIMATES spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Apes, monkeys

Primates

1.1.14.1

Atelidae

       
 

(1) Alouatta coibensis

I

 

Mantled howler monkey

Singe hurleur à manteau

 

(2) Alouatta palliata

I

 

Mantled howler monkey

Singe hurleur à manteau

 

(3) Alouatta pigra

I

 

Guatemalan howler monkey

Hurleur du Guatemala

 

(4) Ateles geoffroyi frontatus

I

 

Black-handed spider monkey

Singe-araignée aux mains noires

 

(5) Ateles geoffroyi ornatus

I

 

Panama spider monkey, Red spider monkey

Atèle de Geoffroy du Panama, Atèle du Panama

 

(6) Brachyteles arachnoides

I

 

Woolly spider monkey

Singe-araignée laineux

 

(7) Brachyteles hypoxanthus

I

 

Northern muriqui

Singe

 

(8) Oreonax flavicauda

I

 

Yellow-tailed woolly monkey

Singe laineux à queue jaune

1.1.14.2

Cebidae

       
 

(1) Callimico goeldii

I

 

Goeldi marmoset

Tamarin de Goeldi

 

(2) Callithrix aurita

I

 

White-eared marmoset

Ouistiti oreillard

 

(3) Callithrix flaviceps

I

 

Buff-headed marmoset

Ouistiti à tête jaune

 

(4) Leontopithecus spp.

I

 

Golden lion marmosets

Singes-lions

 

(5) Saguinus bicolor

I

 

Bare-faced tamarin

Tamarin bicolore

 

(6) Saguinus geoffroyi

I

 

Geoffroy’s tamarin

Tamarin de Geoffroy

 

(7) Saguinus leucopus

I

 

White-footed tamarin

Tamarin à pieds blancs

 

(8) Saguinus martinsi

I

 

Martin’s bare-faced tamarin

Tamarin

 

(9) Saguinus oedipus

I

 

Crested tamarin

Tamarin à perruque

 

(10) Saimiri oerstedii

I

 

Red-backed squirrel monkey

Singe écureuil à dos rouge

1.1.14.3

Cercopithecidae

       
 

(1) Cercocebus galeritus

I

 

Crested mangabey

Cercocèbe à crète

 

(2) Cercopithecus diana

I

 

Diana monkey

Cercopithèque diane

 

(3) Cercopithecus roloway

I

 

Roloway monkey

Cercopithèque diane

 

(4) Macaca silenus

I

 

Lion-tailed macaque

Macaque Ouandérou

 

(5) Macaca sylvanus

I

 

Barbary macaque

Macaque de Gibraltar

 

(6) Mandrillus leucophaeus

I

 

Drill

Drill

 

(7) Mandrillus sphinx

I

 

Mandrill

Mandrill

 

(8) Nasalis larvatus

I

 

Proboscis monkey

Nasique

 

(9) Piliocolobus kirkii

I

 

Zanzibar red colobus

Colobe roux de Zanzibar

 

(10) Piliocolobus rufomitratus

I

 

Tana River red colobus

Colobe roux de la Tana

 

(11) Presbytis potenziani

I

 

Mentawi leaf monkey

Semnopithèque de Mentawi

 

(12) Pygathrix spp.

I

 

Doucs

Doucs

 

(13) Rhinopithecus spp.

I

 

Snub-nosed monkeys

Rhinopithèques

 

(14) Semnopithecus ajax

I

 

Kashmir grey langur

Langur gris cachemire

 

(15) Semnopithecus dussumieri

I

 

Southern Plains grey langur

Semnopithèque de Dussumier

 

(16) Semnopithecus entellus

I

 

Northern Plains grey langur

Entelle de l’Inde

 

(17) Semnopithecus hector

I

 

Tarai grey langur

Langur gris de Tarai

 

(18) Semnopithecus hypoleucos

I

 

Black-footed grey langur

Entelle aux pieds noirs

 

(19) Semnopithecus priam

I

 

Tufted grey langur

Langur gris tuffé

 

(20) Semnopithecus schistaceus

I

 

Nepal grey langur

Semnopithèque ardoisé

 

(21) Simias concolor

I

 

Mentawi Islands snub-nosed langur

Entelle de Pagi

 

(22) Trachypithecus geei

I

 

Golden langur

Entelle dorée

 

(23) Trachypithecus pileatus

I

 

Capped langur

Entelle pileuse

 

(24) Trachypithecus shortridgei

I

 

Shortridge’s langur

Langur de Shortridge

1.1.14.4

Cheirogaleidae

       
 

(1) Cheirogaleidae spp.

I

 

Dwarf lemurs

Chirogales

1.1.14.5

Daubentoniidae

       
 

(1) Daubentonia madagascariensis

I

 

Aye-Aye

Aye-Aye

1.1.14.6

Hominidae

       
 

(1) Gorilla beringei

I

 

Mountain gorilla

Gorille des montagnes

 

(2) Gorilla gorilla

I

 

Gorilla

Gorille

 

(3) Pan spp.

I

 

Chimpanzees

Chimpanzés

 

(4) Pongo abelii

I

 

Sumatran orangutan

Orang-outan de Sumatra

 

(5) Pongo pygmaeus

I

 

Bornean orangutan

Orang-outan de Bornéo

1.1.14.7

Hylobatidae

       
 

(1) Hylobatidae spp.

I

 

Gibbons, siamangs

Gibbons, siamangs

1.1.14.8

Indriidae

       
 

(1) Indriidae spp.

I

 

Indris, avahis, woolly lemurs, sifakas

Indris, avahis, propithèques, sifakas

1.1.14.9

Lemuridae

       
 

(1) Lemuridae spp.

I

 

Lemurs

Lémuriens

1.1.14.10

Lepilemuridae

       
 

(1) Lepilemuridae spp.

I

 

Sportive lemurs

Grands lépilémurs

1.1.14.11

Lorisidae

       
 

(1) Nycticebus spp.

I

 

Slow lorises

Loris lents

1.1.14.12

Pitheciidae

       
 

(1) Cacajao spp.

I

 

Uakaris

Ouakaris

 

(2) Chiropotes albinasus

I

 

White-nosed saki

Saki à nez blanc

1.1.15.0

PROBOSCIDEA

       

1.1.15.1

Elephantidae

       
 

(1) Elephas maximus

I

 

Asian elephant

Éléphant d’Asie

 

(2) Loxodonta africana

(Except the populations of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe, which are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

African elephant

Éléphant d’Afrique

 

(3) Loxodonta africana2

(Only the populations of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe; all other populations are included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

African elephant

Éléphant d’Afrique

1.1.16.0

RODENTIA

       

1.1.16.1

Chinchillidae

       
 

(1) Chinchilla spp.

(Specimens of the domesticated form are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

I

 

Chinchillas

Chinchillas

1.1.16.2

Cuniculidae

       
 

(1) Cuniculus paca

III

Honduras

Paca

Paca

1.1.16.3

Dasyproctidae

       
 

(1) Dasyprocta punctata

III

Honduras

Common agouti

Agouti

1.1.16.4

Erethizontidae

       
 

(1) Sphiggurus mexicanus

III

Honduras

Mexican prehensile-tailed porcupine

Porc-épic préhensile

 

(2) Sphiggurus spinosus

III

Uruguay

Paraguay hairy dwarf porcupine

Coendou épineux

1.1.16.5

Muridae

       
 

(1) Leporillus conditor

II

 

Greater stick-nest rat

Rat architecte

 

(2) Pseudomys fieldi

II

 

Shark Bay false mouse

Fausse souris de la baie de Shark

 

(3) Xeromys myoides

II

 

False water-rat

Faux rat d’eau

 

(4) Zyzomys pedunculatus

II

 

Central thick-tailed rat

Rat à grosse queue

1.1.16.6

Sciuridae

       
 

(1) Cynomys mexicanus

I

 

Mexican prairie dog

Chien de prairie du Mexique

 

(2) Marmota caudata

III

India

Long-tailed marmot

Marmotte à longue queue

 

(3) Marmota himalayana

III

India

Himalayan marmot

Marmotte de l’Himalaya

 

(4) Ratufa spp.

II

 

Giant squirrels

Écureuils géants

1.1.17.0

SCANDENTIA

       
 

(1) SCANDENTIA spp.

II

 

Tree shrews

Tupaies

1.1.18.0

SIRENIA

       

1.1.18.1

Dugongidae

       
 

(1) Dugong dugon

I

 

Dugong

Dugong

1.1.18.2

Trichechidae

       
 

(1) Trichechus inunguis

I

 

Amazonian manatee

Lamantin de l’Amazone

 

(2) Trichechus manatus

I

 

West Indian manatee

Lamantin des Antilles

 

(3) Trichechus senegalensis

I

 

West African manatee

Lamantin du Sénégal

1.2.0.0

AVES

       

1.2.1.0

ANSERIFORMES

       

1.2.1.1

Anatidae

       
 

(1) Anas aucklandica

I

 

Auckland Island flightless teal

Sarcelle terrestre des îles Auckland

 

(2) Anas bernieri

II

 

Madagascar teal

Sarcelle de Madagascar

 

(3) Anas chlorotis

I

 

New Zealand brown duck

Sarcelle de la Nouvelle-Zélande

 

(4) Anas formosa

II

 

Baikal teal

Sarcelle élegante

 

(5) Anas laysanensis

I

 

Laysan duck

Canard de Laysan

 

(6) Anas nesiotis

I

 

Campbell Island flightless teal

Sarcelle de Campbell

 

(7) Asarcornis scutulata

I

 

White-winged duck

Canard à ailes blanches

 

(8) Branta canadensis leucopareia

I

 

Aleutian Canada goose

Bernache canadienne forme leucopareia

 

(9) Branta ruficollis

II

 

Red-breasted goose

Bernache à cou roux

 

(10) Branta sandvicensis

I

 

Hawaiian goose

Oie néné

 

(11) Coscoroba coscoroba

II

 

Coscoroba swan

Cygne coscoroba

 

(12) Cygnus melancoryphus

II

 

Black-necked swan

Cygne à cou noir

 

(13) Dendrocygna arborea

II

 

West Indian whistling-duck

Dendrocygne à bec noir

 

(14) Dendrocygna autumnalis

III

Honduras

Black-bellied tree whistling-duck

Dendrocygne à bec rouge

 

(15) Dendrocygna bicolor

III

Honduras

Fulvous whistling-duck

Dendrocygne bicolore

 

(16) Oxyura leucocephala

II

 

White-headed duck

Canard à tête blanche

 

(17) Rhodonessa caryophyllacea

I

 

Pink-headed duck

Canard à tête rose

 

(18) Sarkidiornis melanotos

II

 

Comb duck

Canard casqué

1.2.2.0

APODIFORMES

       

1.2.2.1

Trochilidae

       
 

(1) Trochilidae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Hummingbirds

Colibris

 

(2) Glaucis dohrnii

I

 

Hook-billed hermit

Colibri à bec incurvé

1.2.3.0

CHARADRIIFORMES

       

1.2.3.1

Burhinidae

       
 

(1) Burhinus bistriatus

III

Guatemala

Double-striped thick-knee

Oedicnème bistrié

1.2.3.2

Laridae

       
 

(1) Larus relictus

I

 

Relict gull

Goéland de Mongolie

1.2.3.3

Scolopacidae

       
 

(1) Numenius borealis

I

 

Eskimo curlew

Courlis esquimau

 

(2) Numenius tenuirostris

I

 

Slender-billed curlew

Courlis à bec grêle

 

(3) Tringa guttifer

I

 

Nordmann’s greenshank

Chevalier maculé

1.2.4.0

CICONIIFORMES

       

1.2.4.1

Balaenicipitidae

       
 

(1) Balaeniceps rex

II

 

Shoebill

Bec-en-sabot du Nil

1.2.4.2

Ciconiidae

       
 

(1) Ciconia boyciana

I

 

Japanese white stork

Cigogne blanche de Corée

 

(2) Ciconia nigra

II

 

Black stork

Cigogne noire

 

(3) Jabiru mycteria

I

 

Jabiru

Jabirou

 

(4) Mycteria cinerea

I

 

Milky wood stork

Tantale blanc

1.2.4.3

Phoenicopteridae

       
 

(1) Phoenicopteridae spp.

II

 

Flamingoes

Flamants

1.2.4.4

Threskiornithidae

       
 

(1) Eudocimus ruber

II

 

Scarlet ibis

Ibis rouge

 

(2) Geronticus calvus

II

 

Southern bald ibis

Ibis du Cap

 

(3) Geronticus eremita

I

 

Hermit ibis

Ibis chauve

 

(4) Nipponia nippon

I

 

Japanese crested ibis

Ibis Nippon

 

(5) Platalea leucorodia

II

 

White spoonbill

Spatule blanche

1.2.5.0

COLUMBIFORMES

       

1.2.5.1

Columbidae

       
 

(1) Caloenas nicobarica

I

 

Nicobar pigeon

Pigeon chauve

 

(2) Ducula mindorensis

I

 

Mindoro imperial-pigeon

Pigeon de Mindoro

 

(3) Gallicolumba luzonica

II

 

Bleeding-heart pigeon

Colombe poignardée

 

(4) Goura spp.

II

 

Crowned pigeons

Gouras

 

(5) Nesoenas mayeri

III

Mauritius

Pink pigeon

Pigeon rose

1.2.6.0

CORACIIFORMES

       

1.2.6.1

Bucerotidae

       
 

(1) Aceros spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Hornbills

Calaos

 

(2) Aceros nipalensis

I

 

Rufous-necked hornbill

Calao à cou roux

 

(3) Anorrhinus spp.

II

 

Hornbills

Calaos

 

(4) Anthracoceros spp.

II

 

Hornbills

Calaos

 

(5) Berenicornis spp.

II

 

White-crested hornbills

Calaos coiffés

 

(6) Buceros spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Rhinoceros hornbills

Calaos rhinocéros

 

(7) Buceros bicornis

I

 

Great Indian hornbill

Calao bicorne

 

(8) Penelopides spp.

II

 

Hornbills

Calaos

 

(9) Rhinoplax vigil

I

 

Helmeted hornbill

Calao à casque

 

(10) Rhyticeros spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Hornbills

Calaos

 

(11) Rhyticeros subruficollis

I

 

Plain-pouched hornbill

Calao à poche

1.2.7.0

CUCULIFORMES

       

1.2.7.1

Musophagidae

       
 

(1) Tauraco spp.

II

 

Turacos

Touracos

1.2.8.0

FALCONIFORMES

       
 

(1) FALCONIFORMES spp.

(Except the species included in Appendices I and III to the Convention and Caracara lutosa and the species of the family Cathartidae, which are not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Eagles, falcons, hawks, vultures

Aigles, faucons, éperviers, vautours

1.2.8.1

Accipitridae

       
 

(1) Aquila adalberti

I

 

Adalbert’s Spanish Imperial eagle

Aigle impérial espagnol

 

(2) Aquila heliaca

I

 

Imperial eagle

Aigle impérial

 

(3) Chondrohierax uncinatus wilsonii

I

 

Cuban hook-billed kite

Milan de Cuba

 

(4) Haliaeetus albicilla

I

 

White-tailed sea eagle

Pygargue à queue blanche

 

(5) Harpia harpyja

I

 

Harpy eagle

Harpie féroce

 

(6) Pithecophaga jefferyi

I

 

Great Philippine monkey-eating eagle

Aigle mangeur de singes

1.2.8.2

Cathartidae

       
 

(1) Gymnogyps californianus

I

 

California condor

Condor de Californie

 

(2) Sarcoramphus papa

III

Honduras

King vulture

Condor roi

 

(3) Vultur gryphus

I

 

Andean condor

Condor des Andes

1.2.8.3

Falconidae

       
 

(1) Falco araeus

I

 

Seychelles kestrel

Émouchet des Seychelles

 

(2) Falco jugger

I

 

Laggar falcon

Faucon laggar

 

(3) Falco newtoni

(Only the population of Seychelles.)

I

 

Madagascar kestrel

Émouchet de Madagascar

 

(4) Falco pelegrinoides

I

 

Barbary falcon

Faucon de barbarie

 

(5) Falco peregrinus

I

 

Peregrine falcon

Faucon pèlerin

 

(6) Falco punctatus

I

 

Mauritius kestrel

Émouchet de l’île Maurice

 

(7) Falco rusticolus

I

 

Gyrfalcon

Faucon gerfaut

1.2.9.0

GALLIFORMES

       

1.2.9.1

Cracidae

       
 

(1) Crax alberti

III

Colombia

Blue-knobbed Albert’s curassow

Hocco du Prince Albert

 

(2) Crax blumenbachii

I

 

Red-billed curassow

Hocco à bec rouge

 

(3) Crax daubentoni

III

Colombia

Yellow-knobbed curassow

Hocco d’Aubenton

 

(4) Crax globulosa

III

Colombia

Wattled curassow

Hocco caronculé

 

(5) Crax rubra

III

Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras

Great curassow

Grand hocco

 

(6) Mitu mitu

I

 

Alagoas
razor-billed curassow

Hocco mitu

 

(7) Oreophasis derbianus

I

 

Horned guan

Pénélope cornue

 

(8) Ortalis vetula

III

Guatemala, Honduras

Plain Eastern chachalaca

Chachalaca de l’Est

 

(9) Pauxi pauxi

III

Colombia

Helmeted curassow

Pauxi Pierre

 

(10) Penelope albipennis

I

 

White-winged guan

Pénélope à ailes blanches

 

(11) Penelope purpurascens

III

Honduras

Crested guan

Pénélope huppée

 

(12) Penelopina nigra

III

Guatemala

Highland little guan

Petite pénélope

 

(13) Pipile jacutinga

I

 

Black-fronted piping guan

Pénélope à plastron

 

(14) Pipile pipile

I

 

Trinidad piping guan

Pénélope siffleuse de la Trinité

1.2.9.2

Megapodiidae

       
 

(1) Macrocephalon maleo

I

 

Maleo megapode

Mégapode maléo

1.2.9.3

Phasianidae

       
 

(1) Argusianus argus

II

 

Great argus pheasant

Argus géant

 

(2) Catreus wallichii

I

 

Cheer pheasant

Faisan de l’Himalaya

 

(3) Colinus virginianus ridgwayi

I

 

Masked bobwhite

Colin de Virginie de Ridgway

 

(4) Crossoptilon crossoptilon

I

 

White-eared pheasant

Faisan oreillard blanc

 

(5) Crossoptilon mantchuricum

I

 

Brown-eared pheasant

Faisan oreillard brun

 

(6) Gallus sonneratii

II

 

Sonnerat’s grey jungle fowl

Coq gris

 

(7) Ithaginis cruentus

II

 

Blood pheasant

Faisan sanguin

 

(8) Lophophorus impejanus

I

 

Himalayan monal

Lophophore

 

(9) Lophophorus lhuysii

I

 

Chinese monal

Lophophore

 

(10) Lophophorus sclateri

I

 

Sclater’s monal

Lophophore

 

(11) Lophura edwardsi

I

 

Edward’s pheasant

Faisan annam

 

(12) Lophura leucomelanos

III

Pakistan

Kalij pheasant

Faisan leucomèle

 

(13) Lophura swinhoii

I

 

Swinhoe’s pheasant

Faisan de Formose

 

(14) Meleagris ocellata

III

Guatemala

Ocellated turkey

Dinde ocellée

 

(15) Pavo cristatus

III

Pakistan

Blue peafowl

Paon bleu

 

(16) Pavo muticus

II

 

Green peafowl

Paon spicifère

 

(17) Polyplectron bicalcaratum

II

 

Common grey peacock-pheasant

Faisan gris, éperonnier gris

 

(18) Polyplectron germaini

II

 

Germain’s peacock-pheasant

Éperonnier de Germain

 

(19) Polyplectron malacense

II

 

Malayan peacock-pheasant

Éperonnier de Malaisie

 

(20) Polyplectron napoleonis

I

 

Palawan peacock-pheasant

Éperonnier de Palawan

 

(21) Polyplectron schleiermacheri

II

 

Bornean Schleiermacher’s peacock-pheasant

Éperonnier de Schleiermacher

 

(22) Pucrasia macrolopha

III

Pakistan

Koklass pheasant

Eulophe koklass

 

(23) Rheinardia ocellata

I

 

Rheinard’s crested argus pheasant

Rhéinarte ocellé

 

(24) Syrmaticus ellioti

I

 

Elliot’s pheasant

Faisan d’Elliot

 

(25) Syrmaticus humiae

I

 

Hume’s pheasant, bar-tailed pheasant

Faisan à queue barrée

 

(26) Syrmaticus mikado

I

 

Mikado pheasant

Faisan Mikado

 

(27) Syrmaticus reevesii

II

 

Reeves’s pheasant

Faisan vénéré

 

(28) Tetraogallus caspius

I

 

Caspian snowcock

Perdrix des neiges caspienne

 

(29) Tetraogallus tibetanus

I

 

Tibetan snowcock

Perdrix des neiges du Tibet

 

(30) Tragopan blythii

I

 

Blyth’s tragopan

Tragopan de Blyth

 

(31) Tragopan caboti

I

 

Cabot’s tragopan

Tragopan de Cabot

 

(32) Tragopan melanocephalus

I

 

Western tragopan

Tragopan à tête noire

 

(33) Tragopan satyra

III

Nepal

Satyr tragopan

Tragopan satyre

 

(34) Tympanuchus cupido attwateri

II

 

Attwater’s greater prairie chicken

Tétras cupidon d’Attwater

1.2.10.0

GRUIFORMES

       

1.2.10.1

Gruidae

       
 

(1) Gruidae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Cranes

Grues

 

(2) Balearica pavonina

I

 

Black crowned crane

Grue couronnée

 

(3) Grus americana

I

 

Whooping crane

Grue blanche d’Amérique

 

(4) Grus canadensis nesiotes

I

 

Cuba sandhill crane

Grue canadienne de Cuba

 

(5) Grus canadensis pulla

I

 

Mississippi sandhill crane

Grue canadienne du Mississippi

 

(6) Grus japonensis

I

 

Red-crowned Japanese crane

Grue du Japon

 

(7) Grus leucogeranus

I

 

Siberian white crane

Grue blanche d’Asie

 

(8) Grus monacha

I

 

Hooded crane

Grue moine

 

(9) Grus nigricollis

I

 

Black-necked crane

Grue à cou noir

 

(10) Grus vipio

I

 

White-naped crane

Grue à cou blanc

1.2.10.2

Otididae

       
 

(1) Otididae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Bustards

Outardes

 

(2) Ardeotis nigriceps

I

 

Great Indian bustard

Grande outarde de l’Inde

 

(3) Chlamydotis macqueenii

I

 

Macqueen’s bustard

Outarde

 

(4) Chlamydotis undulata

I

 

Houbara bustard

Outarde houbara

 

(5) Houbaropsis bengalensis

I

 

Bengal florican

Outarde de l’Inde

1.2.10.3

Rallidae

       
 

(1) Gallirallus sylvestris

I

 

Lord Howe Island rail

Râle de l’île de Lord Howe

1.2.10.4

Rhynochetidae

       
 

(1) Rhynochetos jubatus

I

 

Kagu

Kagou

1.2.11.0

PASSERIFORMES

       

1.2.11.1

Atrichornithidae

       
 

(1) Atrichornis clamosus

I

 

Noisy scrub-bird

Atrichorne bruyante

1.2.11.2

Cotingidae

       
 

(1) Cephalopterus ornatus

III

Colombia

Amazonian ornate umbrellabird

Céphaloptère orné

 

(2) Cephalopterus penduliger

III

Colombia

Long-wattled umbrellabird

Céphaloptère

 

(3) Cotinga maculata

I

 

Banded cotinga

Cotinga maculé

 

(4) Rupicola spp.

II

 

Cocks-of-the-rock

Coqs de roche

 

(5) Xipholena atropurpurea

I

 

White-winged cotinga

Cotinga à ailes blanches

1.2.11.3

Emberizidae

       
 

(1) Gubernatrix cristata

II

 

Yellow cardinal

Bruant à crête

 

(2) Paroaria capitata

II

 

Yellow-billed cardinal

Cardinal à bec jaune

 

(3) Paroaria coronata

II

 

Red-crested cardinal

Cardinal à huppe rouge

 

(4) Tangara fastuosa

II

 

Superb tanager

Calliste superbe

1.2.11.4

Estrildidae

       
 

(1) Amandava formosa

II

 

Green avadavat

Bengali vert

 

(2) Lonchura oryzivora

II

 

Java sparrow

Padda de Java

 

(3) Poephila cincta cincta

II

 

Southern black-throated finch

Diamant à bavette

1.2.11.5

Fringillidae

       
 

(1) Carduelis cucullata

I

 

Red siskin

Tarin rouge du Venezuela

 

(2) Carduelis yarrellii

II

 

Yellow-faced siskin

Tarin de yarrell

1.2.11.6

Hirundinidae

       
 

(1) Pseudochelidon sirintarae

I

 

White-eyed river martin

Hirondelle à lunettes

1.2.11.7

Icteridae

       
 

(1) Xanthopsar flavus

I

 

Saffron-cowled blackbird

Ictéride à tête jaune

1.2.11.8

Meliphagidae

       
 

(1) Lichenostomus melanops cassidix

II

 

Helmeted honeyeater

Méliphage casqué

1.2.11.9

Muscicapidae

       
 

(1) Acrocephalus rodericanus

III

Mauritius

Rodriguez Island brush-warbler

Rousserolle de Rodriguez

 

(2) Cyornis ruckii

II

 

Rueck’s blue-flycatcher

Gobe-mouche de Rueck

 

(3) Dasyornis broadbenti litoralis

II

 

Western rufous bristle-bird

Fauvette rousse de l’Ouest

 

(4) Dasyornis longirostris

II

 

Western bristle-bird

Fauvette des herbes à long bec

 

(5) Garrulax canorus

II

 

Melodious laughingthrush

Garrulaxe hoamy

 

(6) Garrulax taewanus

II

 

Taiwan hwamei

Garrulaxe de Taiwan

 

(7) Leiothrix argentauris

II

 

Silver-eared mesia

Mésia

 

(8) Leiothrix lutea

II

 

Red-billed leiothrix

Léiothrix jaune

 

(9) Liocichla omeiensis

II

 

Omei shan Liocichla

Garrulaxe de l’Omei

 

(10) Picathartes gymnocephalus

I

 

White-necked rockfowl

Picatharte

 

(11) Picathartes oreas

I

 

Grey-necked rockfowl

Picatharte

 

(12) Terpsiphone bourbonnensis

III

Mauritius

Mascarene paradise flycatcher

Tchitrec des Mascareignes

1.2.11.10

Paradisaeidae

       
 

(1) Paradisaeidae spp.

II

 

Birds of paradise

Paradisiers

1.2.11.11

Pittidae

       
 

(1) Pitta guajana

II

 

Blue-tailed pitta

Brève à queue bleue

 

(2) Pitta gurneyi

I

 

Gurney’s pitta

Brève de Gurney

 

(3) Pitta kochi

I

 

Koch’s pitta

Brève de Koch

 

(4) Pitta nympha

II

 

Japanese fairy pitta

Brève du Japon

1.2.11.12

Pycnonotidae

       
 

(1) Pycnonotus zeylanicus

II

 

Straw-headed bulbul

Bulbul à tête jaune

1.2.11.13

Sturnidae

       
 

(1) Gracula religiosa

II

 

Javan Hill talking mynah

Mainate religieux

 

(2) Leucopsar rothschildi

I

 

Rothschild’s starling

Sansonnet de Rothschild

1.2.11.14

Zosteropidae

       
 

(1) Zosterops albogularis

I

 

White-chested white-eye

Zostérops à poitrine blanche

1.2.12.0

PELECANIFORMES

       

1.2.12.1

Fregatidae

       
 

(1) Fregata andrewsi

I

 

Christmas Island frigate bird

Frégate de l’île Christmas

1.2.12.2

Pelecanidae

       
 

(1) Pelecanus crispus

I

 

Dalmatian pelican

Pélican frisé

1.2.12.3

Sulidae

       
 

(1) Papasula abbotti

I

 

Abbott’s booby

Fou d’Abbott

1.2.13.0

PICIFORMES

       

1.2.13.1

Capitonidae

       
 

(1) Semnornis ramphastinus

III

Colombia

Toucan barbet

Barbu toucan

1.2.13.2

Picidae

       
 

(1) Dryocopus javensis richardsi

I

 

Tristram’s woodpecker

Pic de Java

1.2.13.3

Ramphastidae

       
 

(1) Baillonius bailloni

III

Argentina

Saffron toucanet

Toucan de Baillon

 

(2) Pteroglossus aracari

II

 

Black-necked aracari

Araçari grigri

 

(3) Pteroglossus castanotis

III

Argentina

Chestnut-eared aracari

Araçari à oreillons roux

 

(4) Pteroglossus viridis

II

 

Green aracari

Araçari vert

 

(5) Ramphastos dicolorus

III

Argentina

Red-breasted toucan

Toucan à bec vert

 

(6) Ramphastos sulfuratus

II

 

Keel-billed toucan

Toucan à bec caréné

 

(7) Ramphastos toco

II

 

Toco toucan

Toucan toco

 

(8) Ramphastos tucanus

II

 

Red-billed toucan

Toucan à bec rouge

 

(9) Ramphastos vitellinus

II

 

Channel-billed toucan

Toucan ariel

 

(10) Selenidera maculirostris

III

Argentina

Spot-billed toucanet

Toucanet à bec tacheté

1.2.14.0

PODICIPEDIFORMES

       

1.2.14.1

Podicipedidae

       
 

(1) Podilymbus gigas

I

 

Atitlan grebe

Grèbe géant du lac Atitlan

1.2.15.0

PROCELLARIIFORMES

       

1.2.15.1

Diomedeidae

       
 

(1) Phoebastria albatrus

I

 

Short-tailed albatross

Albatros à queue courte

1.2.16.0

PSITTACIFORMES

       
 

(1) PSITTACIFORMES spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention and except Agapornis roseicollis, Melopsittacus undulatus, Nymphicus hollandicus and Psittacula krameri, which are not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Parrots, parakeets, lories, lorikeets, conures, cockatoos, macaws

Perroquets, loris, loriquets, amazones, conures, cacatoès, aras

1.2.16.1

Cacatuidae

       
 

(1) Cacatua goffiniana

I

 

Goffin’s cockatoo

Cacatoès de Goffin

 

(2) Cacatua haematuropygia

I

 

Philippine cockatoo

Cacatoès des Philippines

 

(3) Cacatua moluccensis

I

 

Moluccan cockatoo

Cacatoès des Moluques

 

(4) Cacatua sulphurea

I

 

Yellow-crested cockatoo

Cacatoès soufré

 

(5) Probosciger aterrimus

I

 

Palm cockatoo

Microglosse noir

1.2.16.2

Loriidae

       
 

(1) Eos histrio

I

 

Red and blue lory

Lori arlequin

 

(2) Vini ultramarina

I

 

Ultramarine lorikeet

Lori ultramarin

1.2.16.3

Psittacidae

       
 

(1) Amazona arausiaca

I

 

Red-necked Amazon parrot

Amazone à collier roux

 

(2) Amazona auropalliata

I

 

Yellow-naped Amazon parrot

Amazone à nuque d’or

 

(3) Amazona barbadensis

I

 

Yellow-shouldered Amazon parrot

Amazone de la Barbade

 

(4) Amazona brasiliensis

I

 

Red-tailed Amazon parrot

Amazone à queue rouge

 

(5) Amazona finschi

I

 

Lilac-crowned Amazon parrot

Amazone à couronne lilas

 

(6) Amazona guildingii

I

 

St. Vincent parrot

Amazone de Saint-Vincent

 

(7) Amazona imperialis

I

 

Imperial parrot

Amazone impériale

 

(8) Amazona leucocephala

I

 

Cuban parrot

Amazone à tête blanche

 

(9) Amazona oratrix

I

 

Yellow-headed Amazon parrot

Amazone à tête jaune

 

(10) Amazona pretrei

I

 

Red-spectacled parrot

Amazone à face rouge

 

(11) Amazona rhodocorytha

I

 

Red-browed parrot

Amazone à couronne rouge

 

(12) Amazona tucumana

I

 

Tucuman Amazon

Amazone de Tucuman

 

(13) Amazona versicolor

I

 

St. Lucia parrot

Amazone de Santa Lucia

 

(14) Amazona vinacea

I

 

Vinaceous parrot

Amazone bourgogne

 

(15) Amazona viridigenalis

I

 

Green-cheeked Amazon

Amazone à joues vertes

 

(16) Amazona vittata

I

 

Puerto Rican parrot

Amazone de Porto Rico

 

(17) Anodorhynchus spp.

I

 

Blue macaws

Aras bleus

 

(18) Ara ambiguus

I

 

Green Buffon’s macaw

Ara ambigu de Buffon

 

(19) Ara glaucogularis

I

 

Blue-throated macaw

Ara à gorge bleue

 

(20) Ara macao

I

 

Scarlet macaw

Ara macao

 

(21) Ara militaris

I

 

Military macaw

Ara militaire

 

(22) Ara rubrogenys

I

 

Red-fronted macaw

Ara de Lafresnaye

 

(23) Cyanopsitta spixii

I

 

Spix’s macaw

Ara à face grise

 

(24) Cyanoramphus cookii

I

 

Norfolk parakeet

Perruche de Norfolk

 

(25) Cyanoramphus forbesi

I

 

Chatham Island Yellow-fronted parakeet

Perruche à front jaune de Forbes

 

(26) Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae

I

 

Red-fronted New Zealand parakeet

Perruche de Nouvelle-Zélande

 

(27) Cyanoramphus saisseti

I

 

Red-crowned parakeet

Perruche à front rouge

 

(28) Cyclopsitta diophthalma coxeni

I

 

Coxen’s fig-parrot

Perroquet masqué

 

(29) Eunymphicus cornutus

I

 

Horned parakeet

Perruche cornue

 

(30) Guarouba guarouba

I

 

Golden parakeet

Conure dorée

 

(31) Neophema chrysogaster

I

 

Orange-bellied parrot

Perruche à ventre orangé

 

(32) Ognorhynchus icterotis

I

 

Yellow-eared conure

Conure à oreilles jaunes

 

(33) Pezoporus occidentalis

I

 

Australian night parrot

Perruche nocturne

 

(34) Pezoporus wallicus

I

 

Ground parrot

Perruche terrestre

 

(35) Pionopsitta pileata

I

 

Pileated red-capped parrot

Perroquet à oreilles

 

(36) Primolius couloni

I

 

Blue-headed macaw

Ara de Coulon

 

(37) Primolius maracana

I

 

Blue-winged Illiger’s macaw

Ara d’Illiger

 

(38) Psephotus chrysopterygius

I

 

Golden-shouldered parakeet

Perruche à épaules dorées

 

(39) Psephotus dissimilis

I

 

Hooded parakeet

Perruche à capuchon noir

 

(40) Psephotus pulcherrimus

I

 

Paradise parakeet

Perruche magnifique

 

(41) Psittacula echo

I

 

Mauritius parakeet

Perruche à collier de Maurice

 

(42) Psittacus erithacus

I

 

African grey parrot

Perroquet gris

 

(43) Pyrrhura cruentata

I

 

Blue-throated parakeet

Conure à gorge bleue

 

(44) Rhynchopsitta spp.

I

 

Thick-billed parrots

Perroquets à gros bec

 

(45) Strigops habroptilus

I

 

Owl parrot

Perroquet-hibou

1.2.17.0

RHEIFORMES

       

1.2.17.1

Rheidae

       
 

(1) Pterocnemia pennata

(Except Pterocnemia pennata pennata, which is included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Lesser rhea

Nandou de Darwin

 

(2) Pterocnemia pennata pennata

II

 

Lesser rhea

Nandou de Darwin

 

(3) Rhea americana

II

 

Common rhea

Nandou commun

1.2.18.0

SPHENISCIFORMES

       

1.2.18.1

Spheniscidae

       
 

(1) Spheniscus demersus

II

 

Black-footed cape penguin

Manchot du Cap

 

(2) Spheniscus humboldti

I

 

Humboldt penguin

Manchot de Humboldt

1.2.19.0

STRIGIFORMES

       
 

(1) STRIGIFORMES spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention and Sceloglaux albifacies, which is not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Owls

Hiboux, chouettes

1.2.19.1

Strigidae

       
 

(1) Heteroglaux blewitti

I

 

Forest spotted owlet

Chouette des forêts

 

(2) Mimizuku gurneyi

I

 

Giant scops-owl

Hibou de Gurney

 

(3) Ninox natalis

I

 

Christmas hawk-owl

Chouette des Moluques

1.2.19.2

Tytonidae

       
 

(1) Tyto soumagnei

I

 

Madagascar grass owl

Effraie de Madagascar

1.2.20.0

STRUTHIONIFORMES

       

1.2.20.1

Struthionidae

       
 

(1) Struthio camelus

(Only the populations of Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, the Niger, Nigeria, Senegal and the Sudan; all other populations are not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

I

 

North African ostrich

Autruche de l’Afrique du Nord

1.2.21.0

TINAMIFORMES

       

1.2.21.1

Tinamidae

       
 

(1) Tinamus solitarius

I

 

Solitary tinamou

Tinamou solitaire

1.2.22.0

TROGONIFORMES

       

1.2.22.1

Trogonidae

       
 

(1) Pharomachrus mocinno

I

 

Quetzal

Quetzal

1.3.0.0

REPTILIA

       

1.3.1.0

CROCODYLIA

       
 

(1) CROCODYLIA spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Alligators, caimans, crocodiles

Alligators, caïmans, crocodiles

1.3.1.1

Alligatoridae

       
 

(1) Alligator sinensis

I

 

Chinese alligator

Alligator de Chine

 

(2) Caiman crocodilus apaporiensis

I

 

Rio Apaporis caiman

Caïman du Rio Apaporis

 

(3) Caiman latirostris

(Except the population of Argentina, which is included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Broad-nosed snouted caiman

Caïman à museau large

 

(4) Melanosuchus niger

(Except the population of Brazil, which is included in Appendix II to the Convention, and the population of Ecuador which is included in Appendix II to the Convention and is subject to a zero annual export quota until an annual export quota has been approved by the Secretariat and the IUCN/SSC Crocodile Specialist Group.)

I

 

Black caiman

Caïman noir

1.3.1.2

Crocodylidae

       
 

(1) Crocodylus acutus

(Except the population of the Integrated Management District of Mangroves of the Bay of Cispata, Tinajones, La Balsa and Surrounding Areas, Department of Córdoba, Colombia, and the population of Cuba, which are included in Appendix II to the Convention; as well as the population of Mexico, which is included in Appendix II to the Convention and is subject to a zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

I

 

American crocodile

Crocodile américain

 

(2) Crocodylus cataphractus

I

 

African slender-snouted crocodile

Faux-gavial d’Afrique

 

(3) Crocodylus intermedius

I

 

Orinoco crocodile

Crocodile de l’Orénoque

 

(4) Crocodylus mindorensis

I

 

Philippine Mindoro crocodile

Crocodile de Mindoro

 

(5) Crocodylus moreletii

(Except the population of Belize, which is included in Appendix II to the Convention with a zero quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes, and the population of Mexico, which is included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Morelet’s crocodile

Crocodile de Morelet

 

(6) Crocodylus niloticus

(Except the populations of Botswana, Egypt [subject to a zero quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes], Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania [subject to an annual export quota of no more than 1,600 wild specimens including hunting trophies, in addition to ranched specimens], Zambia and Zimbabwe, which are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Nile crocodile

Crocodile du Nil

 

(7) Crocodylus palustris

I

 

Mugger Marsh crocodile

Crocodile des marais

 

(8) Crocodylus porosus

(Except the populations of Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia [wild harvest restricted to the State of Sarawak and a zero quota for wild specimens for the other States of Malaysia {Sabah and Peninsular Malaysia}, with no change in the zero quota unless approved by the Parties] and Papua New Guinea, which are included in Appendix II to the Convention.)

I

 

Saltwater crocodile

Crocodile marin

 

(9) Crocodylus rhombifer

I

 

Cuban crocodile

Crocodile de Cuba

 

(10) Crocodylus siamensis

I

 

Siamese crocodile

Crocodile du Siam

 

(11) Osteolaemus tetraspis

I

 

Dwarf crocodile

Crocodile nain

 

(12) Tomistoma schlegelii

I

 

False gavial

Faux-gavial malais

1.3.1.3

Gavialidae

       
 

(1) Gavialis gangeticus

I

 

Indian gavial

Gavial du Gange

1.3.2.0

RHYNCHOCEPHALIA

       

1.3.2.1

Sphenodontidae

       
 

(1) Sphenodon spp.

I

 

Tuataras

Hatterias

1.3.3.0

SAURIA

       

1.3.3.1

Agamidae

       
 

(1) Ceratophora aspera

(Zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Rough-nosed horn lizard

Lézard

 

(2) Ceratophora erdeleni

I

 

Erdelen’s horn lizard

Lézard

 

(3) Ceratophora karu

I

 

Karunaratne’s horn lizard

Lézard

 

(4) Ceratophora stoddartii

(Zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Rhino-horn lizard

Lézard

 

(5) Ceratophora tennentii

I

 

Leaf-nose lizard

Lézard

 

(6) Cophotis ceylanica

I

 

Pygmy lizard

Lézard

 

(7) Cophotis dumbara

I

 

Knuckles pygmy lizard

Lézard

 

(8) Lyriocephalus scutatus

(Zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Hump snout lizard

Lézard

 

(9) Saara spp.

II

 

Spiny-tailed lizards

Fouette-queues

 

(10) Uromastyx spp.

II

 

Spiny-tailed lizards

Fouette-queues

1.3.3.2

Anguidae

       
 

(1) Abronia spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention and zero export quota for wild specimens for Abronia aurita, A. gaiophantasma, A. montecristoi, A. salvadorensis, A. vasconcelosii.)

II

 

Alligator lizards

Lézards d’alligator

 

(2) Abronia anzuetoi

I

 

Anzuetoi alligator lizard

Lézard d’alligator

 

(3) Abronia campbelli

I

 

Campbell’s alligator lizard

Lézard d’alligator

 

(4) Abronia fimbriata

I

 

Alligator lizard

Lézard d’alligator

 

(5) Abronia frosti

I

 

Frost’s alligator lizard

Lézard d’alligator

 

(6) Abronia meledona

I

 

Meledona alligator lizard

Lézard d’alligator

1.3.3.3

Chamaeleonidae

       
 

(1) Archaius spp.

II

 

Chameleons

Caméléons

 

(2) Bradypodion spp.

II

 

South African dwarf chameleons

Caméléons nains

 

(3) Brookesia spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Leaf chameleons

Brookésies

 

(4) Brookesia perarmata

I

 

Armoured leaf chameleon

Brookésie d’Antsingy

 

(5) Calumma spp.

II

 

Chameleons

Caméléons

 

(6) Chamaeleo spp.

II

 

Chameleons

Caméléons

 

(7) Furcifer spp.

II

 

Chameleons

Caméléons

 

(8) Kinyongia spp.

II

 

Chameleons

Caméléons

 

(9) Nadzikambia spp.

II

 

Chameleons

Caméléons

 

(10) Palleon spp.

II

 

Chameleons

Caméléons

 

(11) Rhampholeon spp.

II

 

Pygmy chameleons

Caméléons pygmés

 

(12) Rieppeleon spp.

II

 

Pygmy chameleons

Caméléons pygmés

 

(13) Trioceros spp.

II

 

Chameleons

Caméléons

1.3.3.4

Cordylidae

       
 

(1) Cordylus spp.

II

 

Girdled lizards

Cordyles

 

(2) Hemicordylus spp.

II

 

Girdled lizards

Cordyles

 

(3) Karusaurus spp.

II

 

Girdled lizards

Cordyles

 

(4) Namazonurus spp.

II

 

Girdled lizards

Cordyles

 

(5) Ninurta spp.

II

 

Girdled lizards

Cordyles

 

(6) Ouroborus spp.

II

 

Girdled lizards

Cordyles

 

(7) Pseudocordylus spp.

II

 

Girdled lizards

Cordyles

 

(8) Smaug spp.

II

 

Girdled lizards

Cordyles

1.3.3.5

Eublepharidae

       
 

(1) Goniurosaurus spp.

(Except the species native to Japan.)

II

 

Cave geckos

Geckos

1.3.3.6

Gekkonidae

       
 

(1) Cnemaspis psychedelica

I

 

Psychedelic rock gecko

Gecko psychédélique

 

(2) Dactylocnemis spp.

III

New-Zealand

New Zealand geckos

Geckos de la Nouvelle-Zélande

 

(3) Gekko gecko

II

 

Tokay gecko

Gecko tokay

 

(4) Gonatodes daudini

I

 

Union Island gecko

Gecko

 

(5) Hoplodactylus spp.

III

New-Zealand

New Zealand geckos

Geckos de la Nouvelle-Zélande

 

(6) Lygodactylus williamsi

I

 

Turquoise dwarf gecko

Gecko nain de William

 

(7) Mokopirirakau spp.

III

New-Zealand

New Zealand geckos

Geckos de la Nouvelle-Zélande

 

(8) Nactus serpensinsula

II

 

Serpent Island gecko

Gecko de l’île de Serpent

 

(9) Naultinus spp.

II

 

New Zealand geckos

Geckos de la Nouvelle-Zélande

 

(10) Paroedura androyensis

II

 

Grandidier’s Madagascar ground gecko

Gecko

 

(11) Paroedura masobe

II

 

Masobe gecko

Gecko de Madagascar à gros yeux

 

(12) Phelsuma spp.

II

 

Day Madagascar geckos

Geckos de Madagascar

 

(13) Rhoptropella spp.

II

 

Geckos

Geckos

 

(14) Sphaerodactylus armasi

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(15) Sphaerodactylus celicara

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(16) Sphaerodactylus dimorphicus

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(17) Sphaerodactylus intermedius

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(18) Sphaerodactylus nigropunctatus alayoi

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(19) Sphaerodactylus nigropunctatus granti

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(20) Sphaerodactylus nigropunctatus lissodesmus

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(21) Sphaerodactylus nigropunctatus ocujal

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(22) Sphaerodactylus nigropunctatus strategus

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(23) Sphaerodactylus notatus atactus

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(24) Sphaerodactylus oliveri

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(25) Sphaerodactylus pimienta

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(26) Sphaerodactylus ruibali

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(27) Sphaerodactylus siboney

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(28) Sphaerodactylus torrei

III

Cuba

Ball finger gecko

Gecko

 

(29) Toropuku spp.

III

New-Zealand

New Zealand geckos

Geckos de la Nouvelle-Zélande

 

(30) Tukutuku spp.

III

New-Zealand

New Zealand geckos

Geckos de la Nouvelle-Zélande

 

(31) Uroplatus spp.

II

 

Leaf-tailed geckos

Geckos à queue plate

 

(32) Woodworthia spp.

III

New-Zealand

New Zealand geckos

Geckos de la Nouvelle-Zélande

1.3.3.7

Helodermatidae

       
 

(1) Heloderma spp.

(Except the subspecies included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Venomous Beaded lizards

Hélodermes lézards vénéneux

 

(2) Heloderma horridum charlesbogerti

I

 

Guatemalan beaded lizard

Héloderme granuleux

1.3.3.8

Iguanidae

       
 

(1) Amblyrhynchus cristatus

II

 

Marine iguana

Iguane marin

 

(2) Brachylophus spp.

I

 

Banded iguanas

Brachylophes

 

(3) Conolophus spp.

II

 

Land iguanas

Iguanes terrestres

 

(4) Ctenosaura spp.

II

 

Spiny-tailed iguanas

Iguanes à queue épineuse

 

(5) Cyclura spp.

I

 

Rhinoceros iguanas

Iguanes à cornes

 

(6) Iguana spp.

II

 

Common iguanas

Iguanes vrais

 

(7) Phrynosoma blainvillii

II

 

Coast horned lizard

Lézard cornu

 

(8) Phrynosoma cerroense

II

 

Cedros Island horned lizard

Lézard cornu

 

(9) Phrynosoma coronatum

II

 

San Diego horned lizard

Lézard cornu de San Diego

 

(10) Phrynosoma wigginsi

II

 

Gulf Coast horned lizard

Lézard cornu

 

(11) Sauromalus varius

I

 

San Estaban Island chuckwalla

Chuckwalla de l’île de San Esteban

1.3.3.9

Lacertidae

       
 

(1) Gallotia simonyi

I

 

Hierro giant lizard

Lézard géant de Hierro

 

(2) Podarcis lilfordi

II

 

Lilford’s wall lizard

Lézard des Baléares

 

(3) Podarcis pityusensis

II

 

Ibiza wall lizard

Lézard des Pityuses

1.3.3.10

Lanthanotidae

       
 

(1) Lanthanotidae spp.

(Zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Earless monitor lizards

Lézards

1.3.3.11

Polychrotidae

       
 

(1) Anolis agueroi

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

 

(2) Anolis baracoae

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

 

(3) Anolis barbatus

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

 

(4) Anolis chamaeleonides

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

 

(5) Anolis equestris

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

 

(6) Anolis guamuhaya

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

 

(7) Anolis luteogularis

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

 

(8) Anolis pigmaequestris

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

 

(9) Anolis porcus

III

Cuba

Anole

Anole

1.3.3.12

Scincidae

       
 

(1) Corucia zebrata

II

 

Prehensile-tailed skink

Scinque géant des îles Salomon

1.3.3.13

Teiidae

       
 

(1) Crocodilurus amazonicus

II

 

Dragon lizardlet

Crocodilure lézardet

 

(2) Dracaena spp.

II

 

Caiman lizards

Dracènes

 

(3) Salvator spp.

II

 

Feral monitor lizards

Lézards

 

(4) Tupinambis spp.

II

 

Tegu lizards

Tégus

1.3.3.14

Varanidae

       
 

(1) Varanus spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Monitor lizards

Varans

 

(2) Varanus bengalensis

I

 

Bengal monitor

Varan du Bengale

 

(3) Varanus flavescens

I

 

Yellow monitor

Varan jaune

 

(4) Varanus griseus

I

 

Desert monitor

Varan du désert

 

(5) Varanus komodoensis

I

 

Komodo dragon

Dragon de Komodo

 

(6) Varanus nebulosus

I

 

Clouded monitor

Varan du Nil

1.3.3.15

Xenosauridae

       
 

(1) Shinisaurus crocodilurus

I

 

Chinese crocodile lizard

Lézard crocodile de Chine

1.3.4.0

SERPENTES

       

1.3.4.1

Boidae

       
 

(1) Boidae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Boas

Boas

 

(2) Acrantophis spp.

I

 

Madagascar boa constrictors

Boas constricteurs de Madagascar

 

(3) Boa constrictor occidentalis

I

 

Argentina boa constrictor

Boa constricteur de l’Argentine

 

(4) Epicrates inornatus

I

 

Puerto Rican boa

Boa de Porto Rico

 

(5) Epicrates monensis

I

 

Mona Virgin Islands boa

Boa des Îles Vierges

 

(6) Epicrates subflavus

I

 

Jamaican boa

Boa de la Jamaïque

 

(7) Sanzinia madagascariensis

I

 

Madagascar tree boa

Boa arboricole de Madagascar

1.3.4.2

Bolyeriidae

       
 

(1) Bolyeriidae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Round Island boas

Boas de Round Island

 

(2) Bolyeria multocarinata

I

 

Round Island Mauritius boa

Boa de Maurice

 

(3) Casarea dussumieri

I

 

Round Island boa

Boa de Round Island

1.3.4.3

Colubridae

       
 

(1) Atretium schistosum

III

India

Olivaceous
keel-back water snake

Serpent ardoisé

 

(2) Cerberus rynchops

III

India

Dog-faced water snake

Serpent d’eau à tête de chien

 

(3) Clelia clelia

II

 

Mussurana snake

Mussurana

 

(4) Cyclagras gigas

II

 

False water cobra

Faux cobra

 

(5) Elachistodon westermanni

II

 

Westermann’s snake

Couleuvre de Westermann

 

(6) Ptyas mucosus

II

 

Asian rat snake

Serpent-ratier asiatique

 

(7) Xenochrophis piscator

III

India

Chequered
keel-back water snake

Couleuvre pêcheuse

 

(8) Xenochrophis schnurrenbergeri

III

India

Chequered
keel-back water snake

Couleuvre pêcheuse

 

(9) Xenochrophis tytleri

III

India

Chequered
keel-back water snake

Couleuvre pêcheuse

1.3.4.4

Elapidae

       
 

(1) Hoplocephalus bungaroides

II

 

Broad-headed snake

Serpent à taches jaunes

 

(2) Micrurus diastema

III

Honduras

Atlantic coral snake

Serpent-corail

 

(3) Micrurus nigrocinctus

III

Honduras

Black-banded coral snake

Serpent-corail à bandes noires

 

(4) Micrurus ruatanus

III

Honduras

Roatan coral snake

Serpent-corail

 

(5) Naja atra

II

 

Taiwan cobra

Cobra de Taiwan

 

(6) Naja kaouthia

II

 

Monocled cobra

Cobra à monocle

 

(7) Naja mandalayensis

II

 

Burmese spitting cobra

Cobra de Mandalay

 

(8) Naja naja

II

 

Asian or Indian cobra

Cobra indien

 

(9) Naja oxiana

II

 

Central Asian cobra

Cobra d’Asie centrale

 

(10) Naja philippinensis

II

 

Northern Philippine cobra

Cobra cracheur des Philippines

 

(11) Naja sagittifera

II

 

Andaman Cobra

Cobra des îles Andaman

 

(12) Naja samarensis

II

 

Visayan cobra

Cobra des Indes

 

(13) Naja siamensis

II

 

Indochinese spitting cobra

Cobra cracheur indochinois

 

(14) Naja sputatrix

II

 

Southern Indonesian spitting cobra

Cobra cracheur du sud de l’Indonésie

 

(15) Naja sumatrana

II

 

Sumatran cobra

Cobra cracheur doré

 

(16) Ophiophagus hannah

II

 

King cobra

Cobra Hannah

1.3.4.5

Loxocemidae

       
 

(1) Loxocemidae spp.

II

 

Mexican pythons

Pythons mexicains

1.3.4.6

Pythonidae

       
 

(1) Pythonidae spp.

(Except the subspecies included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Pythons

Pythons

 

(2) Python molurus molurus

I

 

Indian rock python

Python de l’Inde

1.3.4.7

Tropidophiidae

       
 

(1) Tropidophiidae spp.

II

 

Wood boas

Boas

1.3.4.8

Viperidae

       
 

(1) Atheris desaixi

II

 

Ashe’s bush viper

Vipère

 

(2) Bitis worthingtoni

II

 

Kenya horned viper

Vipère

 

(3) Crotalus durissus

III

Honduras

South American rattlesnake

Crotale sud-américain

 

(4) Daboia russelii

III

India

Russell’s viper

Vipère de Russell

 

(5) Pseudocerastes urarachnoides

II

 

Spider-tailed viper

Vipère à queue d’araignée

 

(6) Trimeresurus mangshanensis

II

 

Mangshan pit viper

Vipère à fossettes du mont Mang

 

(7) Vipera ursinii

(Only the population of Europe, except any populations in the area which formerly constituted the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; those latter populations are not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

I

 

Orsini’s viper

Vipère d’Orsini

 

(8) Vipera wagneri

II

 

Wagner’s viper

Vipère de Wagner

1.3.5.0

TESTUDINES

       

1.3.5.1

Carettochelyidae

       
 

(1) Carettochelys insculpta

II

 

Pig-nosed turtle

Carrettochélyde d’Australie

1.3.5.2

Chelidae

       
 

(1) Chelodina mccordi

(Zero export quota for wild specimens.)

II

 

Roti snake-necked turtle

Chélodine de McCord

 

(2) Pseudemydura umbrina

I

 

Western short-necked swamp tortoise

Tortue à col de serpent de l’Ouest

1.3.5.3

Cheloniidae

       
 

(1) Cheloniidae spp.

I

 

Marine turtles

Tortues de mer

1.3.5.4

Chelydridae

       
 

(1) Chelydra serpentina

III

United States of America

Snapping turtle

Tortue serpentine

 

(2) Macrochelys temminckii

III

United States of America

Alligator snapping turtle

Tortue alligator

1.3.5.5

Dermatemydidae

       
 

(1) Dermatemys mawii

II

 

Central American river turtle

Tortue de Tabasco

1.3.5.6

Dermochelyidae

       
 

(1) Dermochelys coriacea

I

 

Leatherback sea turtle, leatherback turtle

Tortue luth

1.3.5.7

Emydidae

       
 

(1) Clemmys guttata

II

 

Spotted turtle

Tortue ponctuée

 

(2) Emydoidea blandingii

II

 

Blanding’s Turtle

Tortue mouchetée

 

(3) Glyptemys insculpta

II

 

Wood turtle

Tortue des bois

 

(4) Glyptemys muhlenbergii

I

 

Bog turtle

Tortue de Muhlenberg

 

(5) Graptemys spp.

III

United States of America

Map turtles

Graptémydes

 

(6) Malaclemys terrapin

II

 

Diamondback terrapin

Tortue à dos diamanté

 

(7) Terrapene spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Box turtles

Tortues tabatières

 

(8) Terrapene coahuila

I

 

Coahuila box turtle

Tortue du Mexique

1.3.5.8

Geoemydidae

       
 

(1) Batagur affinis

I

 

Southern River terrapin

Tortue

 

(2) Batagur baska

I

 

River terrapin

Tortue fluviale indienne

 

(3) Batagur borneoensis

(Zero quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Painted batagur

Tortue

 

(4) Batagur dhongoka

II

 

Three-striped roofed turtle

Tortue

 

(5) Batagur kachuga

II

 

Red-crowned roofed turtle

Tortue

 

(6) Batagur trivittata

(Zero quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Burmese roofed turtle

Tortue

 

(7) Cuora spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix II to the Convention; zero quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes for Cuora aurocapitata, C. flavomarginata, C. galbinifrons, C. mccordi, C. mouhotii, C. pani, C. trifasciata, C. yunnanensis and C. zhoui.)

II

 

Southeast Asian box turtles

Tortues-boîtes d’Asie orientale

 

(8) Cuora bourreti

I

 

Bourret’s box turtle

Tortue-boîte de Bourret

 

(9) Cuora picturata

I

 

Southern Vietnam box turtle

Tortue-boîte du sud du Vietnam

 

(10) Cyclemys spp.

II

 

Asian leaf turtles

Tortues d’eau douce

 

(11) Geoclemys hamiltonii

I

 

Spotted black pond turtle

Tortue de Hamilton

 

(12) Geoemyda japonica

II

 

Ryukyu leaf turtle

Tortue

 

(13) Geoemyda spengleri

II

 

Black-breasted leaf turtle

Geoemyde de Spengler

 

(14) Hardella thurjii

II

 

Crowned river turtle

Tortue de rivière

 

(15) Heosemys annandalii

(Zero quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Yellow-headed temple turtle

Hiérémyde d’Annandal

 

(16) Heosemys depressa

(Zero quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Arakan forest turtle

Héosémyde de l’Arakan

 

(17) Heosemys grandis

II

 

Giant Asian pond turtle

Héosémyde géante

 

(18) Heosemys spinosa

II

 

Spiny turtle

Héosémyde épineuse

 

(19) Leucocephalon yuwonoi

II

 

Sulawesi forest turtle

Géosémyde des Célèbes

 

(20) Malayemys macrocephala

II

 

Snail-eating turtle

Émyde

 

(21) Malayemys subtrijuga

II

 

Malayan snail-eating turtle

Malayémyde à trois arêtes

 

(22) Mauremys annamensis

I

 

Annam pond turtle

Émyde d’Annam

 

(23) Mauremys iversoni

III

China

Fujian pond turtle

Émyde d’Iverson

 

(24) Mauremys japonica

II

 

Pond turtle

Émyde

 

(25) Mauremys megalocephala

III

China

Big-headed pond turtle

Émyde chinoise à grosse tête

 

(26) Mauremys mutica

II

 

Yellow pond turtle

Émyde mutique

 

(27) Mauremys nigricans

II

 

Red-necked pond turtle

Émyde chinoise à cou rouge

 

(28) Mauremys pritchardi

III

China

Pritchard’s pond turtle

Émyde de Pritchard

 

(29) Mauremys reevesii

III

China

Reeves’s turtle

Émyde chinoise de Reeves

 

(30) Mauremys sinensis

III

China

Chinese stripe-necked turtle

Émyde chinoise

 

(31) Melanochelys tricarinata

I

 

Three-keeled Asian turtle

Tortue tricarénée

 

(32) Melanochelys trijuga

II

 

Indian black turtle

Tortue noire de l’Inde

 

(33) Morenia ocellata

I

 

Burmese swamp turtle

Tortue de Birmanie

 

(34) Morenia petersi

II

 

Indian eyed turtle

Tortue

 

(35) Notochelys platynota

II

 

Malayan flat-shelled turtle

Tortue-boîte à dos plat

 

(36) Ocadia glyphistoma

III

China

Notch-mouthed stripe-necked turtle

Tortue

 

(37) Ocadia philippeni

III

China

Philippen’s stripe-necked turtle

Tortue

 

(38) Orlitia borneensis

(Zero quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes.)

II

 

Malayan giant turtle

Émyde géante de Bornéo

 

(39) Pangshura spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Roofed turtles

Kachugas

 

(40) Pangshura tecta

I

 

Indian tent turtle

Tortue à toit de l’Inde

 

(41) Sacalia bealei

II

 

Beal’s eyed turtle

Émyde chinoise à trois ocelles

 

(42) Sacalia pseudocellata

III

China

Chinese false-eyed turtle

Émyde

 

(43) Sacalia quadriocellata

II

 

Four-eyed turtle

Émyde chinoise à quatre ocelles

 

(44) Siebenrockiella crassicollis

II

 

Black marsh turtle

Émyde dentelée à trois carènes

 

(45) Siebenrockiella leytensis

II

 

Philippine pond turtle

Héosémyde de Leyte

 

(46) Vijayachelys silvatica

II

 

Cochin forest cane turtle

Tortue

1.3.5.9

Platysternidae

       
 

(1) Platysternidae spp.

I

 

Big-headed turtles

Tortues à grosse tête

1.3.5.10

Podocnemididae

       
 

(1) Erymnochelys madagascariensis

II

 

Madagascar big-headed side-necked turtle

Podocnémide de Madagascar

 

(2) Peltocephalus dumerilianus

II

 

Big-headed Amazon river turtle

Podocnémide de Duméril

 

(3) Podocnemis spp.

II

 

South American river turtles

Tortues fluviatiles d’Amérique du Sud

1.3.5.11

Testudinidae

       
 

(1) Testudinidae spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention. A zero annual export quota has been established for specimens of Centrochelys sulcata removed from the wild and traded for primarily commercial purposes.)

II

 

True tortoises

Tortues terrestres

 

(2) Astrochelys radiata

I

 

Madagascar radiated tortoise

Tortue rayonnée

 

(3) Astrochelys yniphora

I

 

Angulated Madagascar tortoise

Tortue de Madagascar

 

(4) Chelonoidis niger

I

 

Galapagos giant tortoise

Tortue géante des Galapagos

 

(5) Geochelone elegans

I

 

Indian star tortoise

Tortue étoilée de l’Inde

 

(6) Geochelone platynota

I

 

Burmese star tortoise

Tortue étoilée de Birmanie

 

(7) Gopherus flavomarginatus

I

 

Bolson gopher tortoise

Gophère polyphème

 

(8) Malacochersus tornieri

I

 

Pancake tortoise

Tortue à carapace souple

 

(9) Psammobates geometricus

I

 

Geometric tortoise

Tortue géométrique

 

(10) Pyxis arachnoides

I

 

Spider tortoise

Tortue-araignée

 

(11) Pyxis planicauda

I

 

Madagascar flat-tailed tortoise

Pyxide à queue plate

 

(12) Testudo kleinmanni

I

 

Egyptian tortoise

Tortue d’Égypte

1.3.5.12

Trionychidae

       
 

(1) Amyda cartilaginea

II

 

Southeast Asian softshell turtle

Trionyx cartilagineux

 

(2) Apalone ferox

III

United States of America

Florida softshell turtle

Tortue-molle de Floride

 

(3) Apalone mutica

III

United States of America

Smooth softshell turtle

Tortue-molle

 

(4) Apalone spinifera

(Except the subspecies included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

III

United States of America

Spiny softshell turtle

Tortue-molle à épines

 

(5) Apalone spinifera atra

I

 

Cuatro Cienegas black softshell turtle

Tortue noire

 

(6) Chitra spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Narrow-headed softshell turtles

Trionchychinés

 

(7) Chitra chitra

I

 

Southeast Asian narrow-headed softshell turtle

Tortue

 

(8) Chitra vandijki

I

 

Myanmar narrow-headed softshell turtle

Tortue

 

(9) Cyclanorbis elegans

II

 

Nubian flapshell turtle

Tortue

 

(10) Cyclanorbis senegalensis

II

 

Senegal flapshell turtle

Tortue

 

(11) Cycloderma aubryi

II

 

Aubry’s flapshell turtle

Tortue

 

(12) Cycloderma frenatum

II

 

Zambezi flapshell turtle

Tortue

 

(13) Dogania subplana

II

 

Malayan soft-shelled turtle

Tortue

 

(14) Lissemys ceylonensis

II

 

Sri Lankan flapshell turtle

Tortue

 

(15) Lissemys punctata

II

 

Indian flapshell turtle

Tortue

 

(16) Lissemys scutata

II

 

Burmese flapshell turtle

Tortue

 

(17) Nilssonia formosa

II

 

Burmese peacock softshell

Tortue

 

(18) Nilssonia gangetica

I

 

Indian Ganges softshell turtle

Tortue du Gange

 

(19) Nilssonia hurum

I

 

Peacock-marked softshell turtle

Trionyx paon

 

(20) Nilssonia leithii

II

 

Leith’s softshell turtle

Tortue

 

(21) Nilssonia nigricans

I

 

Black softshell turtle

Trionyx sombre

 

(22) Palea steindachneri

II

 

Wattle-necked softshell turtle

Trionyx à cou caronculé

 

(23) Pelochelys spp.

II

 

Giant softshell turtles

Tortues

 

(24) Pelodiscus axenaria

II

 

Chinese softshell turtle

Tortue

 

(25) Pelodiscus maackii

II

 

Chinese softshell turtle

Tortue

 

(26) Pelodiscus parviformis

II

 

Chinese softshell turtle

Tortue

 

(27) Rafetus euphraticus

II

 

Euphrates soft-shell turtle

Tortue

 

(28) Rafetus swinhoei

II

 

Yangtze softshell turtle

Trionyx du Yang-tse

 

(29) Trionyx triunguis

II

 

Nile soft-shell turtle

Tortue

1.4.0.0

AMPHIBIA

       

1.4.1.0

ANURA

       

1.4.1.1

Aromobatidae

       
 

(1) Allobates femoralis

II

 

Brilliant-thighed poison frog

Epipédobate fémorale

 

(2) Allobates hodli

II

 

Poison frog

Epipédobate

 

(3) Allobates myersi

II

 

Poison frog

Epipédobate

 

(4) Allobates zaparo

II

 

Sanguine poison frog

Epipédobate zaparo

 

(5) Anomaloglossus rufulus

II

 

Poison frog

Epipédobate

1.4.1.2

Bufonidae

       
 

(1) Amietophrynus channingi

I

 

Channing’s toad

Crapaud

 

(2) Amietophrynus superciliaris

I

 

Cameroon toad

Crapaud du Cameroun

 

(3) Altiphrynoides spp.

I

 

Viviparous toads

Crapauds vivipares

 

(4) Atelopus zeteki

I

 

Zetek’s frog

Grenouille de Zetek

 

(5) Incilius periglenes

I

 

Monte Verde golden toad

Crapaud doré

 

(6) Nectophrynoides spp.

I

 

Viviparous toads

Crapauds vivipares

 

(7) Nimbaphrynoides spp.

I

 

Viviparous toads

Crapauds vivipares

1.4.1.3

Calyptocephalellidae

       
 

(1) Calyptocephalella gayi

III

Chile

Wide mouth toad

Crapaud à grande bouche

1.4.1.4

Dendrobatidae

       
 

(1) Adelphobates spp.

II

 

Poison frogs

Grenouilles venimeuses

 

(2) Ameerega spp.

II

 

Poison frogs

Grenouilles venimeuses

 

(3) Andinobates spp.

II

 

Poison frogs

Grenouilles venimeuses

 

(4) Dendrobates spp.

II

 

Poison-dart frogs

Dendrobates

 

(5) Epipedobates spp.

II

 

Poison-arrow frogs

Epipedobates

 

(6) Excidobates spp.

II

 

Poison frogs

Grenouilles venimeuses

 

(7) Hyloxalus azureiventris

II

 

Sky-blue poison frog

Epipedobate au ventre bleu

 

(8) Minyobates spp.

II

 

Demonic poison frogs

Minyobates de Steyermark

 

(9) Oophaga spp.

II

 

Poison frogs

Grenouilles venimeuses

 

(10) Phyllobates spp.

II

 

Poison-arrow frogs

Phyllobates

 

(11) Ranitomeya spp.

II

 

Poison frogs

Grenouilles venimeuses

1.4.1.5

Dicroglossidae

       
 

(1) Euphlyctis hexadactylus

II

 

Asian bullfrog

Crapaud d’Asie

 

(2) Hoplobatrachus tigerinus

II

 

Indian bullfrog

Crapaud indien

1.4.1.6

Hylidae

       
 

(1) Agalychnis spp.

II

 

Tree frogs

Rainettes

1.4.1.7

Mantellidae

       
 

(1) Mantella spp.

II

 

Mantellas

Mantelles

1.4.1.8

Microhylidae

       
 

(1) Dyscophus antongilii

II

 

Tomato frog

Grenouille tomate

 

(2) Dyscophus guineti

II

 

False tomato frog

Grenouille tomate

 

(3) Dyscophus insularis

II

 

Antsouhy tomato frog

Grenouille tomate

 

(4) Scaphiophryne boribory

II

 

Burrowing frog

Grenouille verte des terriers

 

(5) Scaphiophryne gottlebei

II

 

Red rain frog

Grenouille rouge

 

(6) Scaphiophryne marmorata

II

 

Burrowing frog

Grenouille verte des terriers

 

(7) Scaphiophryne spinosa

II

 

Burrowing frog

Grenouille verte des terriers

1.4.1.9

Myobatrachidae

       
 

(1) Rheobatrachus spp.

(Except Rheobatrachus silus and Rheobatrachus vitellinus, which are not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Gastric-brooding frogs

Grenouilles à incubation gastrique

1.4.1.10

Telmatobiidae

       
 

(1) Telmatobius culeus

I

 

Titicaca water frog

Grenouille géante de Titicaca

1.4.2.0

CAUDATA

       

1.4.2.1

Ambystomatidae

       
 

(1) Ambystoma dumerilii

II

 

Lake Patzcuaro salamander

Salamandre du lac Patzcuaro

 

(2) Ambystoma mexicanum

II

 

Mexican axolotl

Salamandre du Mexique

1.4.2.2

Cryptobranchidae

       
 

(1) Andrias spp.

I

 

Giant salamanders

Salamandres géantes

 

(2) Cryptobranchus alleganiensis

III

United States of America

Hellbender

Salamandre

1.4.2.3

Hynobiidae

       
 

(1) Hynobius amjiensis

III

China

Amji’s salamander

Salamandre

1.4.2.4

Salamandridae

       
 

(1) Echinotriton chinhaiensis

II

 

Chinhai spiny newt

Triton épineux

 

(2) Echinotriton maxiquadratus

II

 

Mountain spiny newt

Triton épineux

 

(3) Neurergus kaiseri

I

 

Kaiser spotted newt

Triton tacheté de Kaiser

 

(4) Paramesotriton spp.

II

 

Asian warty newts

Petites salamandres de Chine

 

(5) Salamandra algira

III

Algeria

North African fire salamander

Salamandre algire

 

(6) Tylototriton spp.

II

 

Crocodile newts

Triton crocodile

1.5.0.0

ELASMOBRANCHII

       

1.5.1.0

CARCHARHINIFORMES

       

1.5.1.1

Carcharhinidae

       
 

(1) Carcharhinus falciformis

II

 

Silky shark

Requin soyeux

 

(2) Carcharhinus longimanus

II

 

Oceanic whitetip shark

Requin océanique

1.5.1.2

Sphyrnidae

       
 

(1) Sphyrna lewini

II

 

Scalloped hammerhead shark

Requin marteau halicorne

 

(2) Sphyrna mokarran

II

 

Great hammerhead shark

Grand requin marteau

 

(3) Sphyrna zygaena

II

 

Smooth hammerhead shark

Requin marteau commun

1.5.2.0

LAMNIFORMES

       

1.5.2.1

Alopiidae

       
 

(1) Alopias spp.

II

 

Thresher sharks

Requins-renards

1.5.2.2

Cetorhinidae

       
 

(1) Cetorhinus maximus

II

 

Basking shark

Requin pèlerin

1.5.2.3

Lamnidae

       
 

(1) Carcharodon carcharias

II

 

Great white shark

Grand requin blanc

 

(2) Isurus oxyrinchus

II

 

Shortfin mako

Requin-taupe bleu

 

(3) Isurus paucus

II

 

Longfin mako

Petit requin-taupe

 

(4) Lamna nasus

II

 

Porbeagle shark

Requin-taupe commun

1.5.3.0

MYLIOBATIFORMES

       

1.5.3.1

Myliobatidae

       
 

(1) Manta spp.

II

 

Manta rays

Raies mantas

 

(2) Mobula spp.

II

 

Devil rays

Raies mobula

1.5.3.2

Potamotrygonidae

       
 

(1) Paratrygon aiereba

III

Colombia

Ceja river stingray

Paratrygon

 

(2) Potamotrygon spp.

III

National population of Brazil (Brazil)

River stingrays

Potamotrygons

 

(3) Potamotrygon constellata

III

Colombia

Thorny river stingray

Potamotrygon

 

(4) Potamotrygon magdalenae

III

Colombia

Magdalena river stingray

Potamotrygon

 

(5) Potamotrygon motoro

III

Colombia

Ocellate river stingray

Potamotrygon motoro

 

(6) Potamotrygon orbignyi

III

Colombia

Smoothback river stingray

Potamotrygon

 

(7) Potamotrygon schroederi

III

Colombia

Rosette river stingray

Potamotrygon

 

(8) Potamotrygon scobina

III

Colombia

Raspy river stingray

Potamotrygon

 

(9) Potamotrygon yepezi

III

Colombia

Maracaibo river stingray

Potamotrygon

1.5.4.0

ORECTOLOBIFORMES

       

1.5.4.1

Rhincodontidae

       
 

(1) Rhincodon typus

II

 

Whale shark

Requin-baleine

1.5.5.0

PRISTIFORMES

       

1.5.5.1

Pristidae

       
 

(1) Pristidae spp.

I

 

Sawfishes

Poissons-scies

1.5.6.0

RHINOPRISTIFORMES

       

1.5.6.1

Glaucostegidae

       
 

(1) Glaucostegus spp.

II

 

Guitarfish

Guitarre de mer

1.5.6.2

Rhinidae

       
 

(1) Rhinidae spp.

II

 

Wedgefish

Raies

1.6.0.0

ACTINOPTERI

       

1.6.1.0

ACIPENSERIFORMES

       
 

(1) ACIPENSERIFORMES spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Sturgeons

Esturgeons

1.6.1.1

Acipenseridae

       
 

(1) Acipenser brevirostrum

I

 

Shortnose sturgeon

Esturgeon à museau court

 

(2) Acipenser sturio

I

 

European sturgeon

Esturgeon commun d’Europe

1.6.2.0

ANGUILLIFORMES

       

1.6.2.1

Anguillidae

       
 

(1) Anguilla anguilla

II

 

European eel

Anguille d’Europe

1.6.3.0

CYPRINIFORMES

       

1.6.3.1

Catostomidae

       
 

(1) Chasmistes cujus

I

 

Cui-ui

Cui-ui

1.6.3.2

Cyprinidae

       
 

(1) Caecobarbus geertsii

II

 

Blind cave fish

Poisson cavernicole aveugle

 

(2) Probarbus jullieni

I

 

Giant river carp

Barbeau de Jullien

1.6.4.0

OSTEOGLOSSIFORMES

       

1.6.4.1

Arapaimidae

       
 

(1) Arapaima gigas

II

 

Arapaima

Pirarucu

1.6.4.2

Osteoglossidae

       
 

(1) Scleropages formosus

I

 

Asian arowana

Scléropage d’Asie

 

(2) Scleropages inscriptus

I

 

Myanmar arowana

Scléropage de Myanmar

1.6.5.0

PERCIFORMES

       

1.6.5.1

Labridae

       
 

(1) Cheilinus undulatus

II

 

Humphead wrasse

Napoléon

1.6.5.2

Pomacanthidae

       
 

(1) Holacanthus clarionensis

II

 

Clarion angelfish

Demoiselle de Clarion

1.6.5.3

Sciaenidae

       
 

(1) Totoaba macdonaldi

I

 

MacDonald weakfish

Acoupa de MacDonald

1.6.6.0

SILURIFORMES

       

1.6.6.1

Loricariidae

       
 

(1) Hypancistrus zebra

III

Brazil

Zebra pleco

Pleco

1.6.6.2

Pangasiidae

       
 

(1) Pangasianodon gigas

I

 

Thailand giant catfish

Silure géant

1.6.7.0

SYNGNATHIFORMES

       

1.6.7.1

Syngnathidae

       
 

(1) Hippocampus spp.

II

 

Seahorses

Hippocampes

1.7.0.0

COELACANTHI

       

1.7.1.0

COELACANTHIFORMES

       

1.7.1.1

Latimeriidae

       
 

(1) Latimeria spp.

I

 

Coelacanths

Coelacanthes

1.8.0.0

DIPNEUSTI

       

1.8.1.0

CERATODONTIFORMES

       

1.8.1.1

Neoceratodontidae

       
 

(1) Neoceratodus forsteri

II

 

Australian lungfish

Dipneuste

2.0.0.0

ECHINODERMATA

       

2.1.0.0

HOLOTHUROIDEA

       

2.1.1.0

ASPIDOCHIROTIDA

       

2.1.1.1

Stichopodidae

       
 

(1) Isostichopus fuscus

III

Ecuador

Sea cucumber

Concombre de mer

2.1.2.0

HOLOTHURIIDA

       

2.1.2.1

Holothuriidae

       
 

(1) Holothuria fuscogilva

(Entry into effect of the inclusion in Appendix II to the Convention delayed until 28 August 2020.)

II

 

White Teatfish

Holothurieblanche à mamelles

 

(2) Holothuria nobilis

(Entry into effect of the inclusion in Appendix II to the Convention delayed until 28 August 2020.)

II

 

Black Teatfish

Holothurienoire à mamelles

 

(3) Holothuria whitmaei

(Entry into effect of the inclusion in Appendix II to the Convention delayed until 28 August 2020.)

II

 

Black Teatfish

Holothurienoire à mamelles

3.0.0.0

ARTHROPODA

       

3.1.0.0

ARACHNIDA

       

3.1.1.0

ARANEAE

       

3.1.1.1

Theraphosidae

       
 

(1) Aphonopelma albiceps

II

 

Tarantula

Tarentule

 

(2) Aphonopelma pallidum

II

 

Tarantula

Tarentule

 

(3) Brachypelma spp.

II

 

Red-legged tarantulas

Tarentules à pattes rouges

 

(4) Poecilotheria spp.

II

 

Ornamental spiders

Araignées ornementales

3.1.2.0

SCORPIONES

       

3.1.2.1

Scorpionidae

       
 

(1) Pandinus camerounensis

II

 

Emperor scorpion

Scorpion empereur

 

(2) Pandinus dictator

II

 

Emperor scorpion

Scorpion dictateur

 

(3) Pandinus gambiensis

II

 

Giant Senegalese scorpion

Grand scorpion du Sénégal

 

(4) Pandinus imperator

II

 

Emperor scorpion

Scorpion empereur

 

(5) Pandinus roeseli

II

 

Emperor scorpion

Scorpion empereur

3.2.0.0

INSECTA

       

3.2.1.0

COLEOPTERA

       

3.2.1.1

Lucanidae

       
 

(1) Colophon spp.

III

South Africa

Stag beetles

Lucanes cerf-volant

3.2.1.2

Scarabaeidae

       
 

(1) Dynastes satanas

II

 

Satanas beetle

Dynaste satanas

3.2.2.0

LEPIDOPTERA

       

3.2.2.1

Nymphalidae

       
 

(1) Agrias amydon boliviensis

III

Plurinational State of Bolivia

Butterfly

Papillon

 

(2) Morpho godartii lachaumei

III

Plurinational State of Bolivia

Butterfly

Papillon

 

(3) Prepona praeneste buckleyana

III

Plurinational State of Bolivia

Butterfly

Papillon

3.2.2.2

Papilionidae

       
 

(1) Achillides chikae chikae

I

 

Luzon peacock swallowtail

Machaon de luzon

 

(2) Achillides chikae hermeli

I

 

Mindoro peacock swallowtail

Machaon

 

(3) Atrophaneura jophon

II

 

Sri Lankan rose butterfly

Lépidoptère papilionidé du Sri Lanka

 

(4) Atrophaneura pandiyana

II

 

Malabar rose butterfly

Papillon

 

(5) Bhutanitis spp.

II

 

Bhutan glory swallowtail butterflies

Ornithoptères

 

(6) Ornithoptera spp.

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Birdwing butterflies

Ornithoptères

 

(7) Ornithoptera alexandrae

I

 

Queen Alexandra’s birdwing butterfly

Reine Alexandre

 

(8) Papilio homerus

I

 

Homerus swallowtail butterfly

Porte-queue Homerus

 

(9) Papilio hospiton

II

 

Corsican swallowtail butterfly

Porte-queue de Corse

 

(10) Parides burchellanus

I

 

Swallowtail butterfly

Machaon

 

(11) Parnassius apollo

II

 

Mountain apollo butterfly

Apollon

 

(12) Teinopalpus spp.

II

 

Kaiserihind butterflies

Papillons de Kaiser

 

(13) Trogonoptera spp.

II

 

Birdwing butterflies

Papillons, ornithoptères

 

(14) Troides spp.

II

 

Birdwing butterflies

Papillons, ornithoptères

4.0.0.0

ANNELIDA

       

4.1.0.0

HIRUDINOIDEA

       

4.1.1.0

ARHYNCHOBDELLIDA

       

4.1.1.1

Hirudinidae

       
 

(1) Hirudo medicinalis

II

 

Medicinal leech

Sangsue médicinale

 

(2) Hirudo verbana

II

 

Southern medicinal leech

Sangsue de Verbano

5.0.0.0

MOLLUSCA

       

5.1.0.0

BIVALVIA

       

5.1.1.0

MYTILOIDA

       

5.1.1.1

Mytilidae

       
 

(1) Lithophaga lithophaga

II

 

European date mussel

Datte de mer

5.1.2.0

UNIONOIDA

       

5.1.2.1

Unionidae

       
 

(1) Conradilla caelata

I

 

Birdwing pearly mussel

Dysnomie

 

(2) Cyprogenia aberti

II

 

Edible naiad

Dysnomie

 

(3) Dromus dromas

I

 

Dromedary naiad

Dysnomie

 

(4) Epioblasma curtisi

I

 

Curtis’ naiad

Dysnomie

 

(5) Epioblasma florentina

I

 

Yellow-blossom naiad

Dysnomie

 

(6) Epioblasma sampsonii

I

 

Sampson’s naiad

Dysnomie

 

(7) Epioblasma sulcata perobliqua

I

 

White cats paw mussel

Dysnomie

 

(8) Epioblasma torulosa gubernaculum

I

 

Green-blossom

Dysnomie

 

(9) Epioblasma torulosa rangiana

II

 

Tan-blossom naiad

Dysnomie ventrue jaune

 

(10) Epioblasma torulosa torulosa

I

 

Tubercled-blossom naiad

Dysnomie

 

(11) Epioblasma turgidula

I

 

Turgid-blossom naiad

Dysnomie

 

(12) Epioblasma walkeri

I

 

Brown-blossom naiad

Dysnomie

 

(13) Fusconaia cuneolus

I

 

Fine-rayed pigtoe

Moule

 

(14) Fusconaia edgariana

I

 

Shiny pigtoe

Moule

 

(15) Lampsilis higginsii

I

 

Higgin’s eye pearly mussel

Moule

 

(16) Lampsilis orbiculata orbiculata

I

 

Pinkmucket

Moule

 

(17) Lampsilis satur

I

 

Plain pocketbook pearly mussel

Moule

 

(18) Lampsilis virescens

I

 

Alabama lamp pearly mussel

Moule

 

(19) Plethobasus cicatricosus

I

 

White wartyback pearly mussel

Moule

 

(20) Plethobasus cooperianus

I

 

Orange-footed pimpleback pearly mussel

Moule

 

(21) Pleurobema clava

II

 

Clubshell pearly mussel

Moule

 

(22) Pleurobema plenum

I

 

Rough pigtoe

Moule

 

(23) Potamilus capax

I

 

Fat pocketbook pearly mussel

Moule

 

(24) Quadrula intermedia

I

 

Cumberland monkey-face pearly mussel

Moule

 

(25) Quadrula sparsa

I

 

Appalachian monkey-face pearly mussel

Moule

 

(26) Toxolasma cylindrella

I

 

Pale lilliput mussel

Moule

 

(27) Unio nickliniana

I

 

Nicklin’s pearly mussel

Moule

 

(28) Unio tampicoensis tecomatensis

I

 

Tampico pearly mussel

Moule

 

(29) Villosa trabalis

I

 

Cumberland bean pearly mussel

Moule

5.1.3.0

VENEROIDA

       

5.1.3.1

Tridacnidae

       
 

(1) Tridacnidae spp.

II

 

Giant clams

Palourdes géantes

5.2.0.0

CEPHALOPODA

       

5.2.1.0

NAUTILIDA

       

5.2.1.1

Nautilidae

       
 

(1) Nautilidae spp.

II

 

Nautilus

Nautiles

5.3.0.0

GASTROPODA

       

5.3.1.0

MESOGASTROPODA

       

5.3.1.1

Strombidae

       
 

(1) Strombus gigas

II

 

Queen conch

Strombe géante

5.3.2.0

STYLOMMATOPHORA

       

5.3.2.1

Achatinellidae

       
 

(1) Achatinella spp.

I

 

Little agate snails

Escargots

5.3.2.2

Camaenidae

       
 

(1) Papustyla pulcherrima

II

 

Manus green tree snail

Escargots

5.3.2.3

Cepolidae

       
 

(1) Polymita spp.

I

 

Cuban landsnails

Polimita

6.0.0.0

CNIDARIA

       

6.1.0.0

ANTHOZOA

       

6.1.1.0

ANTIPATHARIA

       
 

(1) ANTIPATHARIA spp.

II

 

Black corals

Coraux noirs

6.1.2.0

GORGONACEAE

       

6.1.2.1

Coralliidae

       
 

(1) Corallium elatius

III

China

Boke

Corail

 

(2) Corallium japonicum

III

China

Coral

Corail

 

(3) Corallium konjoi

III

China

White coral

Corail blanc

 

(4) Corallium secundum

III

China

Pink coral

Corail rose

6.1.3.0

HELIOPORACEA

       

6.1.3.1

Helioporidae

       
 

(1) Helioporidae spp.

(Includes only the species Heliopora coerulea. Fossils are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

II

 

Blue corals

Coraux bleus

6.1.4.0

SCLERACTINIA

       
 

(1) SCLERACTINIA spp.

(Fossils are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

II

 

Stony corals, white corals, cluster corals, bird nest corals, cauliflower corals

Madrépores, coraux blancs

6.1.5.0

STOLONIFERA

       

6.1.5.1

Tubiporidae

       
 

(1) Tubiporidae spp.

(Fossils are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

II

 

Organ pipe corals

Tubiporidés

6.2.0.0

HYDROZOA

       

6.2.1.0

MILLEPORINA

       

6.2.1.1

Milleporidae

       
 

(1) Milleporidae spp.

(Fossils are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

II

 

Fire corals

Milléporidés

6.2.2.0

STYLASTERINA

       

6.2.2.1

Stylasteridae

       
 

(1) Stylasteridae spp.

(Fossils are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

II

 

Lace corals

Stylastéridés

1Populations of Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, Peru and Plurinational State of Bolivia (listed in Appendix II to the Convention):

For the exclusive purpose of allowing international trade in fibre from vicuñas (Vicugna vicugna) and their derivative products, only if the fibre comes from the shearing of live vicuñas. Trade in products derived from the fibre may only take place in accordance with the following provisions:

Stylized image of a vicuña set against a mountain with large letters stating VICUÑA [PAÍS DE ORIGEN] - ARTESANÍA

Figure 2 - Text version

Stylized image of a vicuña set against a mountain with large letters stating "VICUÑA [PAÍS DE ORIGEN] - ARTESANÍA"

VICUÑA [COUNTRY OF ORIGIN] - ARTESANÍA

the country of origin must be identified within the square brackets;

2 Populations of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe (listed in Appendix II to the Convention):

For the exclusive purpose of allowing:

On a proposal from the Secretariat, the Standing Committee can decide to cause this trade to cease partially or completely in the event of non-compliance by exporting or importing countries, or in the case of proven detrimental impacts of the trade on other elephant populations.

All other specimens are deemed to be specimens of species included in Appendix I and the trade in them is regulated accordingly.

PART II
Flora

Item

Column I

Regulated Taxa

Column II

Appendix to the Convention

Column III

Listing Country

Column IV

English Common Name

Column V

French Common Name

7.0.0.0

FLORA

       

7.0.1.0

AGAVACEAE

       
 

(1) Agave parviflora

I

 

Little princess agave

Agave

 

(2) Agave victoriae-reginae#4

II

 

Queen Victoria agave

Agave de la Reine Victoria

 

(3) Nolina interrata

II

 

Dehesa beargrass

Agave

 

(4) Yucca queretaroensis

II

 

Queretaro yucca

Yucca

7.0.2.0

AMARYLLIDACEAE

       
 

(1) Galanthus spp.#4

II

 

Snowdrops

Perce-neige

 

(2) Sternbergia spp.#4

II

 

Sternbergias

Crocus d’automne

7.0.3.0

ANACARDIACEAE

       
 

(1) Operculicarya decaryi

II

 

Jabihy

Jabihy

 

(2) Operculicarya hyphaenoides

II

 

Jabihy

Jabihy

 

(3) Operculicarya pachypus

II

 

Tabily

Tabily

7.0.4.0

APOCYNACEAE

       
 

(1) Hoodia spp.#9

II

 

Hoodias

Hoodias

 

(2) Pachypodium spp.#4

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Elephant’s trunks

Pachypodes

 

(3) Pachypodium ambongense

I

 

Elephant’s trunk

Pachypode

 

(4) Pachypodium baronii

I

 

Elephant’s trunk

Pachypode

 

(5) Pachypodium decaryi

I

 

Elephant’s trunk

Pachypode

 

(6) Rauvolfia serpentina#2

II

 

Snake-root devil-pepper

Sarpaganda

7.0.5.0

ARALIACEAE

       
 

(1) Panax ginseng#3

(Only the population of the Russian Federation; no other population is included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Asiatic ginseng

Ginseng asiatique

 

(2) Panax quinquefolius#3

II

 

American ginseng

Ginseng à cinq folioles

7.0.6.0

ARAUCARIACEAE

       
 

(1) Araucaria araucana

I

 

Monkey-puzzle tree

Araucaria du Chili

7.0.7.0

ASPARAGACEAE

       
 

(1) Beaucarnea spp.

II

 

Ponytail palms, Elephant-foot trees

Beaucarneas, Pieds d’éléphant

7.0.8.0

BERBERIDACEAE

       
 

(1) Podophyllum hexandrum#2

II

 

Himalayan may-apple

Podophylle de l’Himalaya

7.0.9.0

BROMELIACEAE

       
 

(1) Tillandsia harrisii#4

II

 

Harris’ tillandsia

Tillande

 

(2) Tillandsia kammii#4

II

 

Kam’s tillandsia

Tillande

 

(3) Tillandsia xerographica#4

II

 

Xerographic tillandsia

Tillande

7.0.10.0

CACTACEAE

       
 

(1) CACTACEAE spp.3, #4

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention and except Pereskia spp., Pereskiopsis spp. and Quiabentia spp.)

II

 

Cacti

Cactus

 

(2) Ariocarpus spp.

I

 

Living rock cacti

Cactus

 

(3) Astrophytum asterias

I

 

Star cactus

Cactus

 

(4) Aztekium ritteri

I

 

Aztec cactus

Cactus aztèque

 

(5) Coryphantha werdermannii

I

 

Jabali pincushion cactus

Cactus

 

(6) Discocactus spp.

I

 

Disco cacti

Cactus

 

(7) Echinocereus ferreiranus ssp. lindsayorum

I

 

Lindsay’s hedgehog cactus

Cactus

 

(8) Echinocereus schmollii

I

 

Lamb’s-tail cactus

Cactus

 

(9) Escobaria minima

I

 

Nellie’s cory cactus

Cactus

 

(10) Escobaria sneedii

I

 

Sneed’s pincushion cactus

Cactus

 

(11) Mammillaria pectinifera

(Includes ssp. solisioides.)

I

 

Conchilinque

Cactus

 

(12) Melocactus conoideus

I

 

Conelike Turk’s-cap cactus

Cactus

 

(13) Melocactus deinacanthus

I

 

Wonderfully bristled Turk’s-cap cactus

Cactus

 

(14) Melocactus glaucescens

I

 

Wooly waxy-stemmed Turk’s-cap cactus

Cactus

 

(15) Melocactus paucispinus

I

 

Few-spined Turk’s-cap cactus

Cactus

 

(16) Obregonia denegrii

I

 

Artichoke cactus

Cactus

 

(17) Pachycereus militaris

I

 

Teddy-bear cactus

Cactus

 

(18) Pediocactus bradyi

I

 

Brady’s pincushion cactus

Cactus

 

(19) Pediocactus knowltonii

I

 

Knowlton’s cactus

Cactus

 

(20) Pediocactus paradinei

I

 

Paradine’s cactus

Cactus

 

(21) Pediocactus peeblesianus

I

 

Peeble’s Navajo cactus

Cactus

 

(22) Pediocactus sileri

I

 

Siler’s pincushion cactus

Cactus

 

(23) Pelecyphora spp.

I

 

Hatchet cacti

Cactus haches

 

(24) Sclerocactus blainei

I

 

Blaine’s fishhook cactus

Cactus

 

(25) Sclerocactus brevihamatus ssp. tobuschii

I

 

Tobusch’s fishhook cactus

Cactus

 

(26) Sclerocactus brevispinus

I

 

Pariette cactus

Cactus

 

(27) Sclerocactus cloverae

I

 

New Mexico fishhook cactus

Cactus

 

(28) Sclerocactus erectocentrus

I

 

Needle-spined pineapple cactus

Cactus

 

(29) Sclerocactus glaucus

I

 

Colorado hookless cactus

Cactus

 

(30) Sclerocactus mariposensis

I

 

Mariposa cactus

Cactus

 

(31) Sclerocactus mesae-verdae

I

 

Mesa Verde cactus

Cactus

 

(32) Sclerocactus nyensis

I

 

Tonopah fishhook cactus

Cactus

 

(33) Sclerocactus papyracanthus

I

 

Grama-grass cactus

Cactus

 

(34) Sclerocactus pubispinus

I

 

Great Basin fishhook cactus

Cactus

 

(35) Sclerocactus sileri

I

 

Siler’s fishhook cactus

Cactus

 

(36) Sclerocactus wetlandicus

I

 

Unita Basin hookless cactus

Cactus

 

(37) Sclerocactus wrightiae

I

 

Wright’s fishhook cactus

Cactus

 

(38) Strombocactus spp.

I

 

Disk cacti

Cactus

 

(39) Turbinicarpus spp.

I

 

Turbinicacti

Cactus

 

(40) Uebelmannia spp.

I

 

Uebelmann cacti

Cactus

7.0.11.0

CARYOCARACEAE

       
 

(1) Caryocar costaricense#4

II

 

Ajo

Cariocar de Costa Rica

7.0.12.0

COMPOSITAE (ASTERACEAE)

       
 

(1) Saussurea costus

I

 

Costus

Saussuréa

7.0.13.0

CUCURBITACEAE

       
 

(1) Zygosicyos pubescens

II

 

Tobory

Tobory

 

(2) Zygosicyos tripartitus

II

 

Betoboky

Betoboky

7.0.14.0

CUPRESSACEAE

       
 

(1) Fitzroya cupressoides

I

 

Alerce

Alerce

 

(2) Pilgerodendron uviferum

I

 

Ciprès de las Guaitecas

Ciprès de las Guaitecas

 

(3) Widdringtonia whytei

II

 

Mulanje cedar

Cèdre de Mulanje

7.0.15.0

CYATHEACEAE

       
 

(1) Cyathea spp.#4

II

 

Tree ferns

Fougères arborescentes

7.0.16.0

CYCADACEAE

       
 

(1) CYCADACEAE spp.#4

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Cycads

Cycadées

 

(2) Cycas beddomei

I

 

Beddom’s cycad

Cycadée

7.0.17.0

DICKSONIACEAE

       
 

(1) Cibotium barometz#4

II

 

Tree fern

Fougère arborescente

 

(2) Dicksonia spp.#4

(Only the populations of the Americas; no other population is included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Tree ferns

Fougères arborescentes

7.0.18.0

DIDIEREACEAE

       
 

(1) DIDIEREACEAE spp.#4

II

 

Didiereas

Didiéréacées

7.0.19.0

DIOSCOREACEAE

       
 

(1) Dioscorea deltoidea#4

II

 

Elephant’s foot

Dioscorée

7.0.20.0

DROSERACEAE

       
 

(1) Dionaea muscipula#4

II

 

Venus fly-trap

Attrape-mouches

7.0.21.0

EBENACEAE

       
 

(1) Diospyros spp.#5

(Populations of Madagascar.)

II

 

Malagasy ebonies

Ébènes de Madagascar

7.0.22.0

EUPHORBIACEAE

       
 

(1) Euphorbia spp.#4

(Succulent species only, except Euphorbia misera and the species included in Appendix I to the Convention. Artificially propagated specimens of cultivars of Euphorbia trigona, artificially propagated specimens of crested, fan-shaped or colour mutants of Euphorbia lactea, when grafted on artificially propagated root stock of Euphorbia neriifolia, and artificially propagated specimens of cultivars of Euphorbia ’Milii’, when they are traded in shipments of 100 or more plants and readily recognizable as artificially propagated specimens, are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.)

II

 

Euphorbias

Euphorbes

 

(2) Euphorbia ambovombensis

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(3) Euphorbia capsaintemariensis

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(4) Euphorbia cremersii

(Includes the forma viridifolia and the var. rakotozafyi.)

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(5) Euphorbia cylindrifolia

(Includes the ssp. tuberifera.)

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(6) Euphorbia decaryi

(Includes the vars. ampanihyensis, robinsonii and spirosticha.)

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(7) Euphorbia francoisii

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(8) Euphorbia moratii

(Includes the vars. antsingiensis, bemarahensis and multiflora.)

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(9) Euphorbia parvicyathophora

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(10) Euphorbia quartziticola

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

 

(11) Euphorbia tulearensis

I

 

Euphorbia

Euphorbe

7.0.23.0

FAGACEAE

       
 

(1) Quercus mongolica#5

III

Russian Federation

Mongolian oak

Chêne de Mongolie

7.0.24.0

FOUQUIERIACEAE

       
 

(1) Fouquieria columnaris#4

II

 

Boojum tree

Fouqueria

 

(2) Fouquieria fasciculata

I

 

Boojum tree

Fouqueria

 

(3) Fouquieria purpusii

I

 

Boojum tree

Fouqueria

7.0.25.0

GNETACEAE

       
 

(1) Gnetum montanum#1

III

Nepal

Gnetum

Gnétum

7.0.26.0

JUGLANDACEAE

       
 

(1) Oreomunnea pterocarpa#4

II

 

Gavilan walnut

Noyer

7.0.27.0

LAURACEAE

       
 

(1) Aniba rosaeodora#12

II

 

Rosewood

Bois de rose

7.0.28.0

LEGUMINOSAE (FABACEAE)

       
 

(1) Dalbergia spp.#15

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Rosewoods

Palissandres

 

(2) Dalbergia nigra

I

 

Brazilian rosewood

Palissandre du Brésil

 

(3) Dipteryx panamensis

III

Costa Rica, Nicaragua

Almendro

Almendro

 

(4) Guibourtia demeusei#15

II

 

Bubinga, African rosewood

Bubinga

 

(5) Guibourtia pellegriniana#15

II

 

Bubinga, African rosewood

Bubinga

 

(6) Guibourtia tessmannii#15

II

 

Bubinga, African rosewood

Bubinga

 

(7) Paubrasilia echinata#10

II

 

Pernambuco wood

Bois de Pernambouc

 

(8) Pericopsis elata#17

II

 

African teak

Teck d’Afrique

 

(9) Platymiscium parviflorum#4

II

 

Cristobal

Cristobal

 

(10) Pterocarpus erinaceus

II

 

African rosewood, Kosso

Palissandre du Sénégal

 

(11) Pterocarpus santalinus#7

II

 

Red sandalwood

Santal rouge

 

(12) Pterocarpus tinctorius#6

II

 

Bloodwood

Padouk d’Afrique

 

(13) Senna meridionalis

II

 

Taraby

Taraby

7.0.29.0

LILIACEAE

       
 

(1) Aloe spp.#4

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention and Aloe vera, also referenced as Aloe barbadensis, which is not included in the Appendices to the Convention.)

II

 

Aloes

Aloès

 

(2) Aloe albida

I

 

Aloe

Aloès blanchâtre

 

(3) Aloe albiflora

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(4) Aloe alfredii

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(5) Aloe bakeri

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(6) Aloe bellatula

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(7) Aloe calcairophila

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(8) Aloe compressa

(Includes the vars. paucituberculata, rugosquamosa and schistophila.)

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(9) Aloe delphinensis

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(10) Aloe descoingsii

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(11) Aloe fragilis

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(12) Aloe haworthioides

(Includes the var. aurantiaca.)

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(13) Aloe helenae

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(14) Aloe laeta

(Includes the var. maniaensis.)

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(15) Aloe parallelifolia

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(16) Aloe parvula

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(17) Aloe pillansii

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(18) Aloe polyphylla

I

 

Spiral aloe

Aloès spiralé

 

(19) Aloe rauhii

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(20) Aloe suzannae

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(21) Aloe versicolor

I

 

Aloe

Aloès

 

(22) Aloe vossii

I

 

Aloe

Aloès de Voss

7.0.30.0

MAGNOLIACEAE

       
 

(1) Magnolia liliifera var. obovata#1

III

Nepal

Magnolia

Magnolia

7.0.31.0

MALVACEAE

       
 

(1) Adansonia grandidieri#16

II

 

Grandidier’s baobab

Baobab de Grandidier

7.0.32.0

MELIACEAE

       
 

(1) Cedrela spp.#6

(Populations of the Neotropics.)

(Entry into effect of the inclusion in Appendix II to the Convention delayed until 28 August 2020.)

II

 

Cedrela

Cedrela

 

(2) Cedrela fissilis#5

(Inclusion in Appendix III to the Convention in effect until 28 August 2020.)

III

Brazil, the Plurinational State of Bolivia

Cedrela

Cedrela

 

(3) Cedrela lilloi#5

(Inclusion in Appendix III to the Convention in effect until 28 August 2020.)

III

Brazil, the Plurinational State of Bolivia

Cedrela

Cedrela

 

(4) Cedrela odorata#5

(Inclusion in Appendix III to the Convention in effect until 28 August 2020.)

III

Brazil, the Plurinational State of Bolivia, and the national populations of Colombia, Guatemala and Peru

Cedrela

Cedrela

 

(5) Swietenia humilis#4

II

 

Pacific coast mahogany

Acajou de la côte du Pacifique

 

(6) Swietenia macrophylla#6

(Populations of the Neotropics.)

II

 

Bigleaf mahogany

Acajou d’Amérique

 

(7) Swietenia mahagoni#5

II

 

Small leaf mahogany

Acajou d’Amérique

7.0.33.0

NEPENTHACEAE

       
 

(1) Nepenthes spp.#4

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Tropical pitcherplants

Népenthès

 

(2) Nepenthes khasiana

I

 

Indian tropical pitcherplant

Népenthès

 

(3) Nepenthes rajah

I

 

Giant tropical pitcherplant

Népenthès

7.0.34.0

OLEACEAE

       
 

(1) Fraxinus mandshurica#5

III

Russian Federation

Manchurian ash

Frêne de Mandchourie

7.0.35.0

ORCHIDACEAE

       
 

(1) ORCHIDACEAE spp.4, #4

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.Seedling or tissue cultures of the Appendix I to the Convention species obtained in vitro, in solid or liquid media, and transported in sterile containers are not subject to the provisions of the Convention if they are artificially propagated.)

II

 

Orchids

Orchidées

 

(2) Aerangis ellisii

I

 

Orchid

Orchidée

 

(3) Cattleya jongheana

I

 

Orchid

Orchidée

 

(4) Cattleya lobata

I

 

Orchid

Lélie lobée

 

(5) Dendrobium cruentum

I

 

Orchid

Orchidée

 

(6) Mexipedium xerophyticum

I

 

Orchid

Orchidée

 

(7) Paphiopedilum spp.

I

 

Asian tropical lady’s-slipper orchids

Orchidées

 

(8) Peristeria elata

I

 

Holy ghost flower

Fleur du Saint-Esprit

 

(9) Phragmipedium spp.

I

 

New World tropical lady’s-slipper orchids

Orchidées

 

(10) Renanthera imschootiana

I

 

Red vanda orchid

Orchidée

7.0.36.0

OROBANCHACEAE

       
 

(1) Cistanche deserticola#4

II

 

Desert-living cistanche

Cistanche

7.0.37.0

PALMAE (ARECACEAE)

       
 

(1) Beccariophoenix madagascariensis#4

II

 

Palm

Palmier

 

(2) Dypsis decaryi#4

II

 

Triangle palm

Palmier triangle

 

(3) Dypsis decipiens

I

 

Butterfly palm

Palmier manambe

 

(4) Lemurophoenix halleuxii

II

 

Red-lemur palm

Palmier

 

(5) Lodoicea maldivica#13

III

Seychelles

Sea coconut

Coco de mer

 

(6) Marojejya darianii

II

 

Palm

Palmier

 

(7) Ravenea louvelii

II

 

Palm

Palmier

 

(8) Ravenea rivularis

II

 

Majestic palm

Palmier

 

(9) Satranala decussilvae

II

 

Palm

Palmier

 

(10) Voanioala gerardii

II

 

Palm

Palmier

7.0.38.0

PAPAVERACEAE

       
 

(1) Meconopsis regia#1

III

Nepal

Poppy

Pavot

7.0.39.0

PASSIFLORACEAE

       
 

(1) Adenia firingalavensis

II

 

Bottle liana

Liane bouteille

 

(2) Adenia olaboensis

II

 

Vahisasety

Vahisasety

 

(3) Adenia subsessilifolia

II

 

Katakata

Katakata

7.0.40.0

PEDALIACEAE

       
 

(1) Uncarina grandidieri

II

 

Uncarina

Uncarina

 

(2) Uncarina stellulifera

II

 

Uncarina

Uncarina

7.0.41.0

PINACEAE

       
 

(1) Abies guatemalensis

I

 

Guatemalan fir

Sapin du Guatemala

 

(2) Pinus koraiensis#5

III

Russian Federation

Korean nut pine

Pin de Corée

7.0.42.0

PODOCARPACEAE

       
 

(1) Podocarpus neriifolius#1

III

Nepal

Podocarp

Podocarpe

 

(2) Podocarpus parlatorei

I

 

Parlatore’s podocarp

Podocarpe d’Argentine

7.0.43.0

PORTULACACEAE

       
 

(1) Anacampseros spp.#4

II

 

Purselanes

Pourpiers

 

(2) Avonia spp.#4

II

 

Avonia

Avonia

 

(3) Lewisia serrata#4

II

 

Saw-toothed lewisia

Lewisia

7.0.44.0

PRIMULACEAE

       
 

(1) Cyclamen spp.5, #4

II

 

Cyclamens

Cyclamens

7.0.45.0

RANUNCULACEAE

       
 

(1) Adonis vernalis#2

II

 

Spring adonis

Adonis du printemps

 

(2) Hydrastis canadensis#8

II

 

Goldenseal

Hydraste du Canada

7.0.46.0

ROSACEAE

       
 

(1) Prunus africana#4

II

 

African cherry

Prunier d’Afrique

7.0.47.0

RUBIACEAE

       
 

(1) Balmea stormiae

I

 

Ayuque

Ayuque

7.0.48.0

SANTALACEAE

       
 

(1) Osyris lanceolata#2

(Populations of Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania.)

II

 

East African sandalwood

Bois de santal est-africain

7.0.49.0

SARRACENIACEAE

       
 

(1) Sarracenia spp.#4

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

North American pitcherplants

Sarracéniacées

 

(2) Sarracenia oreophila

I

 

Green pitcherplant

Sarracéniacée verte

 

(3) Sarracenia rubra ssp. alabamensis

I

 

Alabama canebrake pitcherplant

Sarracéniacée

 

(4) Sarracenia rubra ssp. jonesii

I

 

Mountain sweet pitcherplant

Sarracéniacée

7.0.50.0

SCROPHULARIACEAE

       
 

(1) Picrorhiza kurrooa#2

(Except Picrorhiza scrophulariiflora.)

II

 

Kutki

Kutki

7.0.51.0

STANGERIACEAE

       
 

(1) Bowenia spp.#4

II

 

Cycads

Cycadées

 

(2) Stangeria eriopus

I

 

Hottentot’s head, Stangeria, Fern-leafed cycad

Cycadée

7.0.52.0

TAXACEAE

       
 

(1) Taxus chinensis and infraspecific taxa of this species#2.

II

 

Chinese yew

If

 

(2) Taxus cuspidata and infraspecific taxa of this species6, #2.

II

 

Japanese yew

If

 

(3) Taxus fuana and infraspecific taxa of this species#2.

II

 

Chinese yew

If

 

(4) Taxus sumatrana and infraspecific taxa of this species#2.

II

 

Chinese yew

If

 

(5) Taxus wallichiana#2

II

 

Himalayan yew

If commun de l’Himalaya

7.0.53.0

THYMELAEACEAE (AQUILARIACEAE)

       
 

(1) Aquilaria spp.#14

II

 

Agarwood

Bois d’agar

 

(2) Gonystylus spp.#4

II

 

Ramin

Ramin

 

(3) Gyrinops spp.#14

II

 

Agarwood

Bois d’agar

7.0.54.0

TROCHODENDRACEAE (TETRACENTRACEAE)

       
 

(1) Tetracentron sinense#1

III

Nepal

Tetracentron

Tétracentron

7.0.55.0

VALERIANACEAE

       
 

(1) Nardostachys grandiflora#2

II

 

Indian nard

Nard de l’Inde

7.0.56.0

VITACEAE

       
 

(1) Cyphostemma elephantopus

II

 

Lazampasika

Lazampasika

 

(2) Cyphostemma laza

II

 

Laza

Laza

 

(3) Cyphostemma montagnacii

II

 

Lazambohitra

Lazambohitra

7.0.57.0

WELWITSCHIACEAE

       
 

(1) Welwitschia mirabilis#4

II

 

Welwitschia

Welwitschia de Baines

7.0.58.0

ZAMIACEAE

       
 

(1) ZAMIACEAE spp.#4

(Except the species included in Appendix I to the Convention.)

II

 

Cycads

Zamiacées

 

(2) Ceratozamia spp.

I

 

Ceratozamias

Ceratozamias

 

(3) Encephalartos spp.

I

 

African cycads

Encephalartos

 

(4) Microcycas calocoma

I

 

Palma corcho

Microcycas

 

(5) Zamia restrepoi

I

 

Cigua

Cigua

7.0.59.0

ZINGIBERACEAE

       
 

(1) Hedychium philippinense#4

II

 

Philippine garland flower

Gandasuli

 

(2) Siphonochilus aethiopicus

(Populations of Eswatini, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe.)

II

 

Natal ginger

Gingembre sauvage

7.0.60.0

ZYGOPHYLLACEAE

       
 

(1) Bulnesia sarmientoi#11

II

 

Palo santo

Bulnesia

 

(2) Guaiacum spp.#2

II

 

Tree of life

Bois de vie

3Artificially propagated specimens of the following hybrids and cultivars, as the case may be, are not subject to the provisions of the Convention:

4 Artificially propagated hybrids of the genera Cymbidium, Dendrobium, Phalaenopsis and Vanda are not subject to the provisions of the Convention, if the following conditions are met:

Plants not clearly qualifying for the exemption must be accompanied by appropriate CITES documents.

5 Artificially propagated specimens of cultivars of Cyclamen persicum are not subject to the provisions of the Convention. However, the exemption does not apply to such specimens traded as dormant tubers.

6 Artificially propagated hybrids and cultivars of Taxus cuspidata that are live, in pots or in other small containers, with each consignment being accompanied by a label or document stating the name of the taxon or taxa and the text “artificially propagated”, are not subject to the provisions of the Convention.

#1 All parts and derivatives except the following:

#2 All parts and derivatives except the following:

#3 Whole and sliced roots and parts of roots, excluding manufactured parts or derivatives such as powders, pills, extracts, tonics, teas and confectionery.

#4 All parts and derivatives except the following:

#5 Logs, sawn wood and veneer sheets.

#6 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets and plywood.

#7 Logs, wood chips, powder and extracts.

#8 Underground parts (i.e. roots and rhizomes): in whole, in part and in powder form.

#9 All parts and derivatives except those bearing a label stating “Produced from Hoodia spp. material obtained through controlled harvesting and production under the terms of an agreement with the relevant CITES Management Authority of [Botswana under agreement No. BW/xxxxxx] [Namibia under agreement No. NA/xxxxxx] [South Africa under agreement No. ZA/xxxxxx]”. For the purpose of this footnote, “Management Authority” has the same meaning as in Article I of the Convention.

#10 Logs, sawn wood and veneer sheets, including unfinished wood articles used for the fabrication of bows for stringed musical instruments.

#11 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets, plywood, powder and extracts. Finished products containing extracts as ingredients, including fragrances, are not considered to be covered by this annotation.

#12 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets, plywood and extracts. Finished products containing extracts as ingredients, including fragrances, are not considered to be covered by this annotation.

#13 The kernel (also known as “endosperm”, “pulp” or “copra”) and any derivative.

#14 All parts and derivatives except the following:

#15 All parts and derivatives except the following:

#16 Seeds, fruits and oils.

#17 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets, plywood and transformed wood.

REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS STATEMENT

(This statement is not part of the Regulations.)

Executive summary

Issues: During the 18th Conference of the Parties (CoP18) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), Canada and the other member states (the Parties) adopted 46 amendments to the lists of species protected under the Convention, known as CITES Appendices I and II. In addition, amendments have also been made unilaterally by Parties to CITES Appendix III. In order to comply with Canada’s domestic legislation that implements CITES, the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act (the Act), Canada must amend the Wild Animal and Plant Trade Regulations (WAPTR) to reflect the changes to the CITES appendices.

Description: The amendments reflect the 46 changes to CITES appendices adopted at CoP18 affecting 58 taxa in total. Depending on the amendment, “taxa” can refer to a family, genus, species, subspecies or population. In total, these amendments affect over 400 species or subspecies and include the following:

  • New export controls: 25 taxa added to Appendix II, including 1 species, the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus), which is known to be naturally present in Canada;
  • New import and export controls: 8 taxa added to Appendix I;
  • Removal of import controls and decrease of export controls: 8 taxa transferred from Appendix I to Appendix II;
  • New import controls and increased export controls: 8 taxa transferred from Appendix II to Appendix I; and
  • The addition of or modification to the annotations of 9 taxa listed in Appendix II in order to better facilitate trade.

Modifications to the CITES appendices also take into account changes that have been made to Appendix III, as requested by the Parties in September 2019. These amendments include:

  • New export controls: the addition of 24 taxa to Appendix III; and
  • Removal of all trade controls: the deletion of 6 taxa from Appendix III.

Rationale: The purpose of CITES is to help ensure the survival of wild animals and plants that are, or may be, threatened due to international trade. The Parties to CITES meet every three years to decide on amendments to the CITES appendices, the lists of species protected under the Convention. Canada implements the changes by amending Schedule I to WAPTR to ensure Canada meets its domestic obligations under the Act. The implementation of the CoP18 decisions in Canada will provide general environmental benefits for Canadians. These measures will contribute to the conservation of endangered species in the wild both in Canada and across the globe. In addition, the implementation of the CoP18 decisions in Canada will provide general benefits to the economy, business and trade. Overall, it is expected that these amendments will lead to a decrease in the administrative burden for Canadian businesses.

Issues

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES or the Convention) is an international agreement between states that was established to help ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. The 18th Conference of the Parties to CITES (CoP18) was held in Geneva, Switzerland, from August 17 to 28, 2019. During CoP18, Canada and the other member states (the Parties) adopted 46 amendments to the lists of species protected under the Convention, known as CITES Appendices I and II. In addition, amendments have also been made unilaterally by Parties to CITES Appendix III.

In order to comply with international obligations under CITES, Canada, as a Party to CITES, must implement domestically the decisions adopted by CoP18, which include changes (listing, up-listing, down-listing, de-listing) to Appendix I and Appendix II as well as recent updates to Appendix III requested by Parties. Canada’s implementing legislation, the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act (the Act), requires that the appendices be restated in Schedule I to the Wild Animal and Plant Trade Regulations (WAPTR). As such, amendments are required to Schedule I to WAPTR.

Background

International trade in wildlife species is estimated to be worth billions of dollars each year, and to include hundreds of millions of plant and animal specimens. This trade sector is diverse, ranging from live animals and plants to a vast array of wildlife products derived from them, including food products, exotic leather goods, wooden musical instruments, timber, tourist souvenirs, medicines, and many more. For some species, high exploitation levels as a result of trade can, when combined with other factors such as habitat loss, lead to significant depletion of populations and bring certain species close to extinction.

CITES was adopted on March 3, 1973, in Washington, D.C., and came into force July 1, 1975, after ratification by at least 10 Parties, to help ensure the survival of wild animals and plants by setting controls on the import and/or export of species that are, or may be, threatened due to international trade. There are currently 183 Parties to the Convention and over 37 000 species of animals and plants protected. Canada was the tenth country to ratify the Convention in April 1975. The Department of the Environment (the Department) is responsible for administering CITES on behalf of the Government of Canada. Other federal departments also play a role in the implementation of the CITES.footnote 2 The issuance of CITES permits is coordinated by the Department, in collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and provincial and territorial wildlife authorities. Different types of permits are issued depending on the CITES appendix in which a species is listed and their validity varies (e.g. export permits are valid for 6 months, import permits for 12 months and other specialized permit/certificates are valid for 3 years).footnote 3

The species that are protected under CITES are listed in three appendices to the Convention, known as Appendices I, II and III. Each appendix affords varying degrees of protection through various import and/or export controls. The Parties to CITES meet every three years at the Conferences of the Parties to decide on amendments to be made to CITES Appendices I and II, based on species conservation status and import and/or export information. The Parties have agreed to a set of biological criteriafootnote 4 to help determine whether a species should be included in Appendix I or II. Proposals are discussed among the Parties and then adopted by consensus or a two-thirds majority vote.

CITES also includes exemptions or special provisions, for example, for trade in pre-Convention specimens, cross-border movements of personal and household effects, as well as trade for educational, scientific or propagation purposes. Amendments to Appendices I and II of CITES enter into force for all Parties 90 days after the meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP) at which the amendments were adopted.

CITES Appendix I

Appendix I lists animal and plant species that are threatened with extinction and which are or may be affected by international trade. Subject to certain exceptions, CITES prohibits international trade in specimens of these species for commercial purposes. However, they may be imported or exported for non-commercial purposes (e.g. for educational, personal, scientific, or re-introduction purposes) under strict conditions. A permit or certificate from the country of export or a certificate from the country of re-export and a permit from the country of import is required for species listed in Appendix I.

CITES Appendix II

Appendix II lists species that are not threatened with extinction, but may become threatened if international trade is not regulated and monitored. Some species may also be listed in Appendix II if they are similar in appearance to CITES Appendix I or other Appendix II species, to ensure the protection of the threatened species. Species listed in Appendix II can be traded commercially or for other purposes as long as the necessary authorizations have been obtained. A permit or certificate from the country of export (or a certificate from the country of re-export) is required for species listed in Appendix II.

CITES Appendix III

Appendix III lists species at the request of a Party that is a range statefootnote 5 for the species concerned, when that Party has already implemented domestic controls to regulate trade in the species and requires the cooperation of other Parties to control international trade. Range states may list their species in Appendix III at any time, but are encouraged to time their requests to ensure that they enter into force 90 days after a CoP. Species listed in Appendix III can be traded commercially or for other purposes as long as the necessary authorizations have been obtained. Only one of the following documents will be required: an export permit from any country that has included the species in Appendix III, a certificate of origin for export from other countries that are part of the species’ range, or a re-export certificate from the country of re-export.

Implementation process in Canada

To implement amendments to the CITES appendices in Canada, two independent processes take place: Canada’s treaty implementation process and the regulatory amendment process. Each process is carried out independently of one another and can therefore be undertaken in different sequences.

Canada’s process for implementing international treaties or amendments to treaties includes multiple steps. As a first step, the amendments to the CITES must be tabled in Parliament.As per Canada’s Policy on the Tabling of International Treaties, amendments to the CITES appendices are tabled in the House of Commons for 21 sitting days. The CoP18 amendments to Appendices I and II as well as recent amendments to CITES Appendix III were tabled from February 5, 2020, to May 16, 2020. During this period, members of Parliament are afforded the opportunity to initiate a debate or request a vote on a motion regarding the treaty. Following the tabling of the amendments in Parliament, an order in council is sought to authorize the Minister of Foreign Affairs to accept, on behalf of Canada, that the amendments to Appendices I and II adopted at CoP18 be binding on Canada.

In addition to the treaty implementation process, Canada must also make regulatory amendments to comply with subsection 21(2) of the Act which requires that changes to the CITES appendices be reflected in WAPTR.

Temporary reservations

CITES provides that amendments to Appendices I and II enter into force 90 days after the meeting of the CoP at which the amendment was made. A Party may, however, submit a reservation to the amendments such that the Party is not bound by the amendments. Following CoP18, Canada submitted a temporary reservation to the CITES Depository Government (Switzerland)footnote 6 indicating that it would not be bound by the CoP18 amendments to the CITES appendices until such a time as it has completed its domestic treaty implementation process. This temporary reservation ensures Canada’s compliance with the Convention while Canada completes its domestic implementation process. Following the Minister of Foreign Affairs’ acceptance of the CoP18 amendments, Canada will withdraw its reservation to the amendments to the appendices.

Objective

The objective of these amendments to Schedule I to WAPTR is to reflect the changes to the CITES appendices agreed to by CoP18 in Canada’s domestic legislation. This will ensure Canada meets its domestic obligations under the Act.

The amendments will also contribute to international efforts in the conservation of species at risk, and to ensure that Canada’s regulatory framework is aligned with that of other Parties to the Convention, including the United States and the European Union, facilitating trade for Canadian businesses.

Description

The WAPTR amendments reflect the 46 changes to the CITES appendices adopted at CoP18. These changes affect a total of 58 taxa (depending on the amendment, “taxa” can refer to a family, genus, species, subspecies or population) and over 400 species or subspecies. The full listing of the affected species can be found in Annex I of this Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement. The changes resulting from the modifications to the CITES appendices include the following:

Removal or reduction in trade controls

Description of change

Number of taxa affected

Down-listing from Appendix I to Appendix II (removal of import controls and decrease of export controls)

8 taxa

New or increased trade controls

Description of change

Number of taxa affected

Addition to Appendix II (new export control)

25 taxa (including 1 species, the shortfin mako shark [Isurus oxyrinchus], which is known to be naturally present in Canada)

Addition to Appendix I (new import and export controls)

8 taxa

Up-listing from Appendix II to Appendix I (new import controls and increased export controls)

8 taxa

Other amendments

Description of change

Number of taxa affected

Modifications to the annotations

9 taxa

In addition, the amendments to WAPTR also reflect updates to CITES Appendix III, as requested by the Parties in September 2019. Each Party is entitled to make unilateral amendments to Appendix III to list species for which they have implemented domestic controls or to remove a specie. These amendments are not subject to a decision of the Conference of the Parties. The changes requested by the Parties include the addition of 24 taxa to Appendix III (new export controls) and the removal of 6 taxa from Appendix III (removal of all trade controls).

Other minor amendments to Schedule I to WAPTR have been made including changing the names of several species or species groups as a result of the Parties’ vote at CoP18 to amend the standard nomenclature of species listed in the CITES appendices.

Regulatory development

Consultation

The consultation process for CoP18 was initiated in January 2018. At this time, the Department sent an email to a targeted group of stakeholders as well as Indigenous organizations to give them advanced notice of the upcoming CoP18 meeting consultation process. This email also included a call for proposals for changes to the CITES appendices. No suggestions for proposals were received.

In December 2018, a dedicated webpage for the consultation process was established on the Department’s website to further inform stakeholders, Indigenous groups and the Canadian public of the consultation process. These same groups were invited to provide comments on proposals submitted by other Parties to CITES for consideration at CoP18 (Canada submitted a proposal on behalf of the Standing Committee to revise the annotation for species of rosewood previously listed in Appendix II at CoP17). A Notice of Intent was also published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on January 5, 2019, giving stakeholders, Indigenous groups and the Canadian public an opportunity to submit comments on the CoP18 proposals. The Department also proactively notified stakeholders, including Indigenous organizations, of the opportunity to comment.

This was followed by a public consultation meeting, held in Ottawa on February 26–27, 2019, to discuss the CoP18 proposals. The Notice of Intent included mention of the in-person meetings, to raise awareness of the opportunity to participate in these meetings. These meetings were attended by representatives of six non-government organizations, five industry associations and interested members of the public. In the aggregate, considering all methods used during the consultation, the Department received a number of verbal comments during the public meetings, as well as 26 written comments from stakeholders.

During the consultation process, the Department highlighted that Canada uses a consistent scientific principles-based approach to decision-making at CITES CoPs, and that based on the scientific data, Canada would not support the listing of species to the CITES appendices where it is clear that the species’ survival is not negatively impacted by trade or where species do not meet the CITES biological criteria for listing in the appendices.

Comments specific to species native to Canada

The woolly mammoth is an extinct species found as a fossil in Canada that is trade as an elephant ivory substitutes. The proposal to list this species in Appendix II was discussed during the public meetings — specifically, whether it was appropriate and/or within the purview of CITES to propose the direct listing of an extinct species and whether or not such a listing would have a direct conservation benefit to the African and Asian elephants. There were no groups or individuals that attended the public meetings that actively supported the proposal and all the comments received during the meeting were opposed to the listing of the mammoth. However, subsequent to the consultation meetings, three international non-government organizations and one individual submitted written comments to the Department in support of listing the woolly mammoth, while another individual was opposed. Canada did not support the proposal at the meeting, as there was insufficient evidence that regulating this trade would have a positive conservation outcome for elephant populations. In the end, the proposal to list the woolly mammoth in Appendix II was withdrawn by the sponsoring Party at CoP18 following a lack of support from the Parties during the discussions.

With respect to the proposal to list mako sharks (shortfin mako and longfin mako) in Appendix II, two industry associations and a non-governmental organization indicated they were not supportive of the proposal and two non-government organizations were supportive of the proposal. The groups that did not support the mako proposal were of the view that an Appendix II listing would not provide conservation benefit to the species beyond the benefits of the current management regime for the species described in the proposal submitted to CoP18 (PDF), and as the Canadian mako population is caught as bycatch in other fisheries could possibly have a negative impact on those fisheries. Canada originally opposed this proposal, as the species did not meet the biological criteria for inclusion in Appendix II. However, Canada decided to take a precautionary approach and supported this proposal based on new preliminary information only available after the consultation process was completed that suggested that certain parts of the distribution may be at greater risk to fishing pressure than previously thought.

Other species-specific comments

In addition to the feedback received during the consultation meetings, the Department received written comments relating to proposals on species not native to Canada from a variety of conservation organizations, industry associations, a member of Parliament, and interested members of the public. These comments were taken into consideration during the development of Canada’s positions. Stakeholders provided Canada with information that aided in the development and support of Canadian positions on species including the giraffe, lizards, geckos, turtles, sharks, rays and rosewoods. Concerning the change to the annotation (a footnote to the listing specifying the parts controlled by CITES) for rosewoods listed in Appendix II, no comments were received including from businesses in high-end furniture, flooring and musical instruments that trade in the species.

Canada’s negotiating positions for the 56 CoP18 species proposals were published on the Department’s website on July 5, 2019. When it did not agree with certain stakeholder comments, it communicated Canada’s principles-based approach, which consists of supporting a proposal only where it is consistent with the CITES mandate and where species meet the CITES biological criteria for listing in a given appendix.

The final outcomes of the CoP18 meeting were published on October 23, 2019, following the close of CoP18. A second Notice of Intent was published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on January 18, 2020, to give the Canadian public, stakeholders and Indigenous organizations advanced notice that regulatory amendments would be made to implement the decisions made at CoP18, and that the Department would be seeking an exemption from prepublishing the amendments in the Canada Gazette, Part I. An exemption from prepublication is typically sought by the Department for CITES amendments given the extensive consultations undertaken prior to Canada’s participation in CoPs, to help inform the Government’s position on the proposals and due to Canada’s obligation to implement the changes agreed to in CoPs.

Modern treaty obligations and Indigenous engagement and consultation

The amendments to WAPTR are not expected to impact the section 35 rights of Indigenous peoples, modern treaties, or international human rights obligations. The Department communicated and consulted with Indigenous groups prior to CoP18 and has continued to engage Indigenous groups following the close of CoP18.

Instrument choice

Non-regulatory options were not considered given that the Act requires that the CITES appendices be reflected in regulations. Any changes to the appendices must therefore be updated in WAPTR.

Regulatory analysis

Benefits and costs

While most of the new trade controls associated with these amendments are not anticipated to impact Canadians or Canadian businesses, there are a few that affect species native to Canada or species known to be traded in Canada that are anticipated to have some minor impacts. The following table provides a brief overview of the decisions made at CoP18 regarding the changes to CITES Appendices I and II that could plausibly impact Canadian businesses and/or result in costs to the Government of Canada. Data used in this section is taken from the CITES Trade Database (CTD) or from the proposals submitted in advance of CoP18.

REMOVAL OR REDUCTION IN TRADE CONTROLS

Scientific name

Description of change

Anticipated impact

Crocodylus acutus

American crocodile

Transfer from Appendix I to II

CTD data shows that this species has been imported into Canada in small numbers, on an infrequent basis for commercial purposes. A negligible reduction in administrative cost for Canadian business importing this species into Canada is anticipated.

Vicugna vicugna

Vicuña

Transfer from Appendix I to II

CTD data shows that this species has been imported into Canada in small numbers, on an infrequent basis for commercial purposes. A negligible reduction in administrative cost for Canadian business importing this species into Canada is anticipated.

NEW OR INCREASED TRADE CONTROLS

Scientific name

Description of change

Anticipated impact

Aonyx cinerea

Asian small-clawed otter

Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I

CTD data shows that this species has been imported into Canada in small numbers, on a relatively frequent basis for commercial and zoological purposes. This species is known to be traded internationally for the pet market. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Geochelone elegans

Indian star tortoise

Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I

CTD data shows that this species has been imported into Canada in small numbers, on an infrequent basis for commercial and personal purposes. This species is known to be traded internationally for the pet market. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Malacochersus tornieri

Pancake tortoise

Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I

CTD data shows that this species has been imported into Canada in small numbers, on an infrequent basis for commercial purposes. This critically endangered species is known to be traded internationally for the pet market. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Ceratophora spp.

Lizards

(3 species are included in this taxon)

Inclusion in Appendix I

No trade data on this species is available for Canada. However, this species is known to be popular within the international pet trade. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Cophotis spp.

Pygmy lizards

(2 species are included in this taxon)

Inclusion in Appendix I

No trade data on this species is available for Canada. However, this species is known to be popular within the international pet trade. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Gonatodes daudini

Union Island gecko

Inclusion in Appendix I

No trade data on this species is available for Canada. However, this species is known to be popular within the North American and European pet trade. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Cedrela spp.

Cedars (Spanish cedars)

(17 species are included in this taxon)

(with annotation #6 [populations of the Neotropics])

Inclusion in Appendix II

CTD data shows that this species has historically been imported into Canada in large numbers, on a frequent basis for commercial purposes. However, recent data shows a decrease in frequency in years leading up to 2018, where just one import was declared into Canada. This species is known to be popular within many international trade markets for commercial trade purposes. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Ceratophora spp.

Lizards

(2 species are included in this taxon)

Inclusion in Appendix II

No trade data on this species is available for Canada. However, this species is known to be popular within the international pet trade. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Ctenosaura spp.

Spiny-tailed iguanas

(18 species are included in this taxon)

Inclusion in Appendix II

CTD data shows that this species has been imported into Canada in small numbers, on an infrequent basis for commercial purposes. A negligible increase in administrative costs for Canadian businesses importing this species into Canada is anticipated.

Gekko gecko

Tokay gecko

Inclusion in Appendix II

No trade data on this species is available for Canada. However, this species is known to be quite popular within the international pet trade. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Goniurosaurus spp.

Tiger gecko, leopard gecko, cave gecko

(except the species native to Japan)

Inclusion in Appendix II

No trade data on this species is available for Canada. However, this species is known to be quite popular within many international trade markets for domestication and commercial trade purposes. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Lyriocephalus scutatus

Hump snout lizard

Inclusion in Appendix II

No trade data on this species is available for Canada. However, this species is known to be popular within the international pet trade. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Isurus oxyrinchus

Shortfin mako

Inclusion in Appendix II

No trade data on this species is specifically available for Canada. This species is known to be popular within many international trade markets for commercial trade purposes, including consumption. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Isurus paucus

Longfin mako

Inclusion in Appendix II

No trade data on this species is specifically available for Canada. This species is known to be popular within many international trade markets for commercial trade purposes, including consumption. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Paroedura androyensis

Grandidier’s Madagascar ground gecko

Inclusion in Appendix II

No trade data on this species is specifically available for Canada. However, this species is known to be quite popular within the international pet trade. An analysis of the costs and benefits is provided below.

Poecilotheria spp.

Ornamental spiders

(15 species are included in this taxon)

Inclusion in Appendix II

CTD data shows that this species has been imported into Canada in small numbers, on a frequent basis for the pet trade. This species is known to be popular within many international trade markets for the same purposes. A negligible increase in administrative costs for Canadian businesses importing this species into Canada is anticipated.

Tylototriton spp.

Crocodile newts

(25 species are included in this taxon)

Inclusion in Appendix II

CTD data shows that this species has been imported into Canada in small numbers, on an infrequent basis. This species is known to be popular within the international pet trade. A negligible increase in administrative costs for Canadian businesses importing this species into Canada is anticipated.

#6 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets and plywood.

Benefits

The imp of the CoP18 decisions in Canada will provide environmental benefits for Canadians. While these benefits cannot easily be quantified, these measures will contribute to the conservation of endangered species in the wild both in Canada and internationally. In cases where trade controls are lessened or removed altogether, these measures will enable authorities to focus greater attention on species that benefit from such controls.

Plants and animals, together with the environments where they live, make up the ecosystems that benefit humans through valuable services such as provision of food and medicines, flood control, and pollination. Implementation of the CoP18 amendments in Schedule I to WAPTR will contribute to the promotion and maintenance of international biodiversity, which will benefit diverse ecosystems worldwide and help ensure those ecosystems can continue to function and provide the services we depend on.

Implementation of the CoP18 amendments in Schedule I to WAPTR will also benefit Canadians, as they will know that Canada is taking concrete actions to help ensure that endangered species will continue to exist. Previous surveys have indicated that a majority of Canadians (85%) believe that federal laws protecting species at risk are crucial to the diversity and abundance of wildlife, which are in turn beneficial to our economy and health (IPSOS Reid Survey, December 2012).

In addition, the implementation of the CoP18 decisions in Canada will provide general benefits to the economy, business and trade. Generally, Canadians and Canadian businesses engaged in the international trade of endangered species would benefit because of the harmonization of Canadian import and/or export practices and permitting requirements with the standards and practices of international partners, including the United States and the European Union. This will ensure continued access to important trade markets. Without permits issued under WAPTR, legal trade in CITES-listed species (or their derivative products) with other CITES partners would not be possible.

Furthermore, the amendments also result in the down-listing of certain species which will likely lead to a reduction in the administrative costs for Canadians who trade or travel internationally with specimens of these species.

Rosewoods and bubingas

The amendment to the annotation applicable to the genus Dalbergia (rosewoods) and three species of the genus Guibourtia (bubingas) are expected to provide a modest decrease in costs to both the federal government and Canadian businesses as the annotation now excludes finished products from the CITES permitting requirements.footnote 7 No species from either genus are native to Canada; however, both are commonly imported into Canada by Canadian businesses which then re-export secondary finished products (e.g. high-end furniture, flooring and musical instruments) to other countries, or used by travelling professional musicians or orchestras.

The changes agreed to at CoP18 reverse changes made at CoP17.footnote 8 Prior to CoP17, only one rosewood species was listed in Appendix I, and only ten rosewood species and the populations of Madagascar rosewoods (approximately 60 species) were listed in Appendix II or Appendix III. Prior to CoP17, no species of bubingas were listed in the CITES appendices. Therefore, at that time, trade was not controlled for the majority of these species and commercial export of the approximately 70 rosewood species listed in Appendices II and III was allowed when specimens were accompanied by the appropriate CITES permits. Prior to CoP17, these permitting requirements did not apply to most Canadian exporters, because the permitting requirements applied only to exports or re-exports of primary commodities (e.g. logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets). Secondary processed products (e.g. high-end furniture, ornate flooring, musical instruments, etc.) did not require permit. Therefore, prior to CoP17, the CITES listing for rosewoods resulted in only a minimal amount of administrative burden for Canadian exporters.

At CoP17, the decision was made to list the entire genus Dalbergia (approximately 305 species including rosewoods) as well as three species of Guibourtia (inbcluding bugingas) in Appendix II. In addition, the annotation for these species was amended to include finished products (e.g. furniture, flooring and musical instruments) that had previously been excluded.footnote 9 As a result of these changes, Canadian exporters needed significantly more CITES permits to export their products than in the past. Specifically, as the table below shows, for the three-year period prior to when the CoP17 changes were implemented the CITES Management Authority at the Department issued on average two CITES permits annually for Appendix II Dalbergia species and no permits annually for Guibourtia species. For the (nearly) three years since the implementation of the CoP17 changes in Canada,footnote 10 the CITES Management authority issued on average 381 CITES permits annually for Appendix II Dalbergia species and 27 permits annually for Guibourtia species, an increase of 406 permits annually for these species.

 

Dalbergia (Appendix II)

Guibourtia (Appendix II)

2014 (Pre-CoP17)

1

0

2015 (Pre-CoP17)

0

0

2016 (Pre-CoP17)

4

0

2017 (Post-CoP17)

545

17

2018 (Post-CoP17)

379

59

2019 (Post-CoP17) table 6 note *

240

5

Table 6 note(s)

Table 6 note *

Permitting data up to October 31, 2019, regarding these permits.

Return to table 6 note * referrer

While the rosewood species remain in Appendix II of CITES as per the CoP17 decision, the amendments to the annotation made at CoP18 substantially decrease CITES permitting requirements by excluding finished products from CITES controls.footnote 11 Given the significant drop in permit applications that are expected from the exclusion of these finished products (2 permits annually as opposed to 415 permits annually), these changes are expected to save Canadian businesses $8,533 annually (in 2019 dollars).footnote 12 These businesses are mostly small businesses. In present value terms (using a 7% discount rate), the savings are estimated at approximately $59,932 over a ten-year period (2021–2030).

Costs to businesses

The only expected costs to businesses resulting from the implementation of the CoP18 decisions in Canada involve administrative costs. The amendments may introduce new or increased administrative requirements for some species that are not native to Canada but are known to be traded in Canada. The associated administrative costs for Canadian business are expected to be minimal.

It should be noted that costs associated with changes to the CITES appendices made at CoP are, to some degree, felt in Canada whether or not Canada implements the changes domestically. The reason for this is that in order to trade with businesses and individuals in other countries that are Parties to CITES, Canadian businesses and individuals who import or export specimens of CITES-listed species need to obtain CITES-equivalent documentation from the Canadian federal government. As such, failure to implement the changes domestically would not avoid the administrative costs to businesses associated with having to apply for permits. However, a failure to implement in Canada would lessen the overall effectiveness of international efforts to regulate and enforce international trade of wildlife and species and risk, and, Canada would not be meeting its commitments under CITES.

In light of this, the administrative costs outlined below for the shortfin mako and species of geckos and lizards may not be fully attributable to WAPTR amendments. However, given that Canada is obligated to implement these changes to WAPTR as part of our international commitments, it is assumed, for the purposes of this analysis, that the changes in administrative costs for businesses are attributable to the regulatory amendments.

Shortfin mako shark

In the case of the only species native to Canada, CITES trade controls are being implemented for the first time (i.e. species added to CITES Appendix I or II that were not previously listed in the CITES appendices) with the listing of the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) to CITES Appendix II. The northern limit of the shortfin mako’s distribution in the North Atlantic extends into Canadian waters and the species is regularly taken as bycatch in Canadian fisheries — primarily by pelagic long line fleets targeting swordfish. Landings of shortfin mako vary on an annual basis, generally ranging between 50 and 100 tonnes per year. A small number of shortfin mako are also caught in other fisheries. Overall, the annual landed value for mako shark in Canada ranges between $200,000 and $300,000. All shortfin mako sharks landed in Canada are exported. The administrative cost (i.e. applying for an export permit) resulting from the listing of this species in Appendix II of the CITES is expected to be minimal.footnote 13

Other species

Where trade controls would increase, that is for the species for which data on imports and exports can be found in the CTD and that were previously listed on a CITES appendix, none are native to Canada and none are commonly traded commercially in Canada.footnote 14 For the species for which CITES trade controls are being proposed for the first time, there is little trade data available for many of these species in Canada. There was previously no need to collect such data. However, export data from the country of origin or import data from other countries (specifically the United States and the European Union) can provide some indication of the presence of these species in the pet trade in Canada.footnote 15

In the case of species such as cave geckos (Goniurosaurus spp.),footnote 16 tokay geckos (Gekko gecko),footnote 17 Union Island geckos (Gonatodes daudini)footnote 18 and Grandidiers Madagascar ground geckos (Paroedura androyensis),footnote 19 import/export data suggest that specimens of these species are likely to be found in the pet trade in Canada. These data do not provide sufficient evidence for accurately estimating the impacts of these regulatory amendments on Canadian consumers and businesses.footnote 20 However, given the popularity of these species as pets in countries similar to Canada, it is estimated that several thousand live specimens of these species enter Canada annually. The additional administrative burden associated with exports of these species from their countries of origin could lead to minor increased costs for Canadian businesses that purchase the specimens of these two species. These costs could then be passed on to the consumers. However, these additional costs are expected to be negligible compared to the price of live specimens of these species.footnote 21

For several other species such as garden geckos (Calotes nigrilabris and Calotes pethiyagodai), horned lizards (Ceratophora spp.), pygmy lizards (Cophotis ceylanica and Cophotis dumbara) and hump-nosed lizards (Lyriocephalus scutatus),footnote 22 the limited import/export data indicate that the pet trade involving these species is prevalent in certain countries. However, in Canada, trade in these species is quite limited or non-existent. For other species, available data on trade (legal or illegal) are not sufficient to allow it to be quantified with accuracy.

In addition, all species of the genus Cedrela (Spanish cedars) were listed in Appendix II at CoP 18 (entry into effect delayed by 12 months).footnote 23 Canada is an important destination for exports of Spanish cedars. These new requirements are not expected to have a significant impact in Canada because the annotation adopted along with the Appendix II listing, specifies that the listing only applies to exports or re-exports of primary commodities (i.e. logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets and sometimes plywood), whereas use of these timber species in Canada is mainly for artisanal purposes. These secondary processed products (e.g. high-end furniture, ornate flooring, etc.) will not require permits for export from Canada; therefore, the listing of Cedrela in Appendix II is expected to result in only a minimal amount of administrative burden for Canadian exporters.

Overall, some businesses (notably those that import small lizards, frogs, turtles, etc. for the pet trade and those that export shortfin mako sharks) could see a minimal increase in administrative burden as a result of the CoP18 changes. This is due to permitting requirements on species that previously did not require a permit. The United States maintains trade data for all wildlife being imported into the United States and this information is often included in proposals as evidence of the extent of trade in a species being proposed for inclusion in the CITES appendices. As the population of Canada is approximately 10% of the population of that in the United States, Canada estimates the number of individuals of a species being imported into Canada as 10% of the comparable import into the United States. Based on this model and the data in the proposals submitted to CoP18, the estimated number of individual specimens of cave gecko (Goniurosaurus spp.), the Grandidier’s Madagascar ground gecko (Paroedura androyensis) and the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) annually imported into Canada is estimated at 100, 1 300 and 1 800, respectively. Assuming that shipments of these species contain 50 individual specimens and each shipment requires a CITES permit from the exporting country, annually, there would be 2 shipments of cave geckos, 26 shipments of Grandidier’s Madagascar ground geckos, and 36 shipments of tokay geckos including both live individuals and parts and derivatives for medicinal purposes. This results in an annual total of 64 shipments for which foreign export permits will now be required.footnote 24 In addition, it is estimated that eight companies that export shortfin mako sharks to the United States will need to complete ten permit applications annually given the listing of this species on CITES Appendix II at CoP18. The resulting annualized average costs for the 28 Canadian businesses are estimated at $1,242 (in 2019 dollars). The affected Canadian businesses are all small businesses. In present value terms (using a 7% discount rate), the total costs are estimated at approximately $8,725 over the ten-year period of 2021–2030.footnote 25

The listing of other plant species, which are readily available in the Canadian retail market, may also lead to an increase in administrative burden for Canadian businesses, but this impact is expected to be minimal. Aside from the species discussed above, the other species for which amendments to the CITES appendices (and ultimately WAPTR) are being made are not known to be commonly exported from or imported into Canada and are therefore assumed to result in no incremental impacts to Canadians or Canadian businesses.

Costs to Government

It would cost the Government of Canada an estimated $218,000 per year (in 2019 dollars) to fully implement the amendments to Schedule I to WAPTR. This includes $76,300 in the first year for upfront costs, such as training, and $6,000 in the first year after implementation for compliance promotion activities. As such, the amendments are estimated to result in $302,400 in total costs to the Government for the first year and $216,100 for each subsequent year. In present value terms (using a 7% discount rate), these costs are estimated at approximately $1.7 million over the ten-year period of 2021–2030. Government costs for permitting operations are expected to decrease slightly. The table below presents a summary statement of overall costs and benefits of these Regulations.

Accounting Statement

Total PV

Annualized Average

Quantified impacts (7% discount rate, in 2019 dollars, 10-year time frame, base year 2021)

Costs to businesses

New permits for commercial exporters of shortfin mako sharks

$2,362

$336

New permits for commercial exporters of other species

$6,363

$906

Subtotal

$8,725

$1,242

Costs to Government

Compliance promotion and enforcement

$1,710,342

$224,730

Subtotal

$1,710 342

$224,730

Total costs

$1,719,067

$225,972

Benefits to businesses

Fewer permits for commercial exporters of finished products of Rosewood

$59,932

$8,533

Subtotal

$59,932

$8,533

Total benefits

$59,932

$8,533

TOTAL NET VALUE

-$1,659,135

-$217,439

Small business lens

These amendments will result in an overall positive impact for small businesses involved in importing/exporting species where the permitting requirements have been lessened or eliminated, leading to a minor decrease in administrative costs.

For the amendments that will impose new or additional permitting requirements, flexible approaches to limit the impact on small businesses could not be considered, as these amendments are consequential to an international agreement. These amendments will require small businesses to obtain an import/export permit when required, which increases administrative costs.

The table below presents the costs that these amendments will impose on small businesses. There are 28 businesses that will incur administrative costs concerning permitting for the shortfin mako sharks and other small reptiles. For the 28 affected businesses, the annualized average cost of the amendments is estimated at $1,242 (in 2019 dollars). In present value terms, the total cost is estimated at $8,725 over ten years (discounted at 7%).

Overall, these amendments would, however, result in cost savings for small businesses as a whole, since the lessening or eliminating of permitting requirements for some species will lead to a reduction in administrative costs, which will affect 103 businesses.

Small Business Lens Summary

Number of small businesses impacted: 131

Number of years: 10

Base year for costing: 2021

Compliance Costs

Annualized Value

Present Value

N/A

$0

$0

TOTAL

$0

$0

Administrative Costs

Annualized Value

Present Value

  • Familiarization with requirements to obtain CITES permit
  • Completion and submission of permit application

$1,242

$8,725

TOTAL

$1,242

$8,725

TOTAL COST
(all impacted small businesses)

$1,242

$8,725

Cost per impacted small business

$44

$312

Cost Saving

Annualized Value

Present Value

  • Fewer permits for commercial exporters of finished products that contain Rosewood

$7,717

$54,199

TOTAL COST SAVING
(all impacted small businesses)

$7,717

$54,199

Cost saving per impacted small business

$75

$526

One-for-one rule

The amendments are expected, in some cases, to lessen or eliminate permitting requirements leading to a minor decrease in administrative burden for certain businesses. In other cases, the amendments will impose new or additional permitting requirements for import into or export from Canada a specimen of a species listed on the CITES appendices. This would lead to an increase in administrative burden for businesses. Overall, the amendments are expected to result in a net reduction in administrative burden for Canadian businesses in the annualized average amount of $6,439 (in 2012 dollars), which represents an average annualized amount of $51 (in 2012 dollars) per businesses. However, the administrative burden represented here was first introduced in 2017 through SOR/2017-123 and was exempted from the requirement to offset it under the Red Tape Reduction Act (RTRA). Therefore, this reduction in administrative burden cannot be counted as a reduction for the purposes of the one-for-one rule. Under the one-for-one rule, there would be an increase in administrative burden, $1,197 (in 2012 dollars) in average annualized terms that would count as an IN. Given that these amounts are non-discretionary in nature, these amendments are exempt from the requirement to offset under the RTRA.

Based on permitting data, changes to the status of rosewoods (Dalbergia) and bubingas (Guibourtia) are expected to considerably lessen the administrative burden on Canadian businesses and consumers given the finished products that will be excluded from permitting requirements via the amended annotation. The changes are expected to save Canadian businesses an annualized average amount of $7,636 (in 2012 dollars). In present value terms (using a 7% discount rate), these cost savings would total approximately $53,630 for Canadian businesses over the ten-year period of 2021–2030.

Additionally, the listing of new species in CITES appendices I or II that were not previously listed in the CITES appendices may increase costs to Canadian businesses. Import/export data for many of these species are incomplete. The limited available data leads to the conclusion that, in the case of some species, trade is prevalent in Canada and the new regulatory requirements would increase costs to businesses. In the case of other species, trade is limited or non-existent and the new regulatory requirements would therefore have a negligible impact on Canadian businesses and consumers.

Overall, and assuming a minimal increase in administrative cost (estimated at approximately $1,197 in average annualized terms) for permit applications for other species that were listed or up-listed at CoP18, these cost increases will be significantly less than the cost decreases (366 fewer permits annually for businesses), resulting from the changes to Dalbergia and Guibourtia. Accordingly, it is expected that the amendments will result in a net decrease in administrative burden as the cost decreases outweigh the cost increase.

Regulatory cooperation and alignment

Canada’s fulfilling of its commitments under CITES supports international regulatory cooperation. All Parties, including Canada, are required to comply with CITES. Article XV of CITES provides that amendments to the species listings in appendices I and II enter into force for all Parties within 90 days after the meeting of the CoP at which the amendment was made. Given that Canada has often been unable to meet this 90-day timeline for completing Canada’s treaty implementation process, Canada submits temporary reservations to the amendments to the appendices in order to remain in compliance with the Convention. While such temporary reservations are in place, Canada is treated as a non-Party with respect to trade in the species concerned by the amendments. After CoP18, Canada entered a temporary reservation, indicating that the amendments for Appendices I and II would not take effect until Canada completed its domestic treaty implementation process. Following its completion, Canada will withdraw its reservation to the amendments to the appendices. Once Canada’s domestic implementation process is complete, and the reservation to the CoP18 amendments withdrawn, Canada will have fulfilled its international commitments.

Canada’s compliance with the CITES permit system helps to ensure regulatory alignment with the other Parties. Canadians or Canadian businesses who seek to import or export specimens of species or species groups added to the CITES appendices with other Parties will require the appropriate permits from the Government of Canada. Therefore, these amendments will support regulatory alignment with other Parties, such as the United States.

Strategic environmental assessment

A Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) was completed for these amendments to Schedule I to WAPTR. The assessment noted that the Department will be implementing Canada’s international obligations under CITES and will comply with the Act, which will contribute to international efforts in the conservation of endangered species and help to ensure harmonized regulatory requirements with trading partners who are also Parties to the Convention. These amendments are expected to positively impact the environment on a global scale by protecting species at risk and conserving biodiversity both in Canada and abroad. Additionally, they will contribute to the healthy wildlife population goal of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14: Life below water as well as SDG 15: Life on land.

Gender-based analysis plus

A gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) has been completed for the amendments to Schedule I to WAPTR. The result of this analysis indicates that no GBA+ impacts have been identified.

Implementation, compliance and enforcement, and service standards

The Department will work broadly to promote compliance with the amendments through The Department’s CITES website, the distribution of the CITES brochures and posters for travellers, commercial importers/exporters, digital messages in specific Service Canada offices, exhibits in major Canadian airports, as well as through other initiatives of the Government of Canada, as required.

The Department, along with federal and provincial partners, will also promote compliance by engaging directly with Canadians affected by the amendments (e.g. furniture and musical instrument manufacturers, the pet trade industry, etc.). This may include activities such as conducting presentations, developing fact sheets and promoting awareness of the Department’s CITES website.

The primary means to detect non-compliance is the inspection by the Department’s wildlife officers of international shipments of wild animals and plants, their parts and derivatives, at the border and other entry points. CBSA also plays a role at ports of entry, manually verifying and validating permits, and referring shipments to the Department’s wildlife officers as required for inspection. Wildlife officers may also inspect facilities where there are wild animal or plant specimens, or activities governed by the Act.

In the event that a contravention occurs, the Act provides for penalties, including fines or imprisonment, seizure, and forfeiture of things seized or of the proceeds of their disposition. In 2017, the fine regime, enforcement and sentencing provisions prescribed under the Act were amended to more accurately reflect the seriousness of environmental offences. Offences designated under subsection 22(1) of the Act, which involve contraventions of the Act, contraventions of court Orders made under the Act, and certain regulations made under the Act, are subject to minimum and higher maximum fines. For example, the fine associated to a designated offence for an individual on summary conviction is no less than $5,000 and no more than $300,000, or imprisonment for a term of not more than six months, or both. For other persons, such as large corporations, the fine associated to a designated offence on summary conviction is no less than $100,000 and no more than $4,000,000. Those figures double for second or subsequent offences.

Contact

Caroline Ladanowski
Director
Wildlife Management and Regulatory Affairs
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 Saint-Joseph Boulevard, 16th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3
Telephone: 819‑938‑4105
Email: ec.ReglementsFaune-WildlifeRegulations.ec@canada.ca

Annex I: Details of the amendments to Schedule I to WAPTR

Transfer of Species From CITES Appendix I to CITES Appendix II – Removal of Import Controls and Decrease of Export Controls (8 Taxa)

Scientific name

Common name

Description

Crocodylus acutus

(population of Mexico with a zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes)

American crocodile

This river crocodile is distributed across various neotropical regions of the Americas. Main threats include poaching, habitat loss, land-use changes and human-crocodile interactions. With historic limitations to exports for commercial purposes, trade of this species from the wild is mainly for scientific purposes. Most commercial trade is in ranched or captive bred specimens.

Dasyornis broadbenti litoralis

Western rufous bristlebird

This species was endemic to the southwestern coast of western Australia and is considered to be extinct.

Dasyornis longirostris

Western bristlebird

This species is endemic to southwestern Western Australia and is not in trade.

Leporillus conditor

Greater stick-nest rat

This species is endemic to Australia and there is no utilization of it, and no trade recorded.

Pseudomys fieldi praeconis

(with amendment to the name to Pseudomys fieldi in compliance with standard nomenclature)

Shark Bay mouse

This species became extinct on the mainland and from two islands of Australia by the 19th century. The only natural surviving population is on Bernier Island, although specimens were successfully translocated to North West Island and Faure Island in Western Australia. There is no evidence of trade threatening the survival of this species.

Vicugna vicugna

(population of the province of Salta, Argentina)

(transfer with annotation #1)

Vicuña

The vicuña (a relative to llamas) is a key species throughout South America for its cultural and biological value and for possessing some of the finest natural fibres in the world. Poaching remains the main threat to the species.

Xeromys myoides

Water mouse

This species is endemic to northern Australia and Papua New Guinea. There is no incidence of trade in this species and future commercial trade is unlikely. The threats to this species are the loss, degradation and fragmentation of its habitat.

Zyzomys pedunculatus

Central rock rat

This rat is endemic to Australia. Threats of this species are fires and predation by feral cats. There is no evidence of trade threatening the survival of this species.

#1 All parts and derivatives except the following:

Transfer of species from CITES Appendix II to CITES Appendix I – New import controls and increased export controls (8 taxa)

Scientific name

Common name

Description

Aonyx cinerea

Asian small-clawed otter

This species of otter is widespread throughout Southeast Asia. Illegal trade as pets and for commercial purposes, including fur and traditional medicine, poses a significant threat to this species.

Balearica pavonina

Black-crowned crane; West African crowned crane

Scattered populations of this species occur throughout sub-Saharan western Africa from Senegambia to Chad. International trade is driven through the capture of live birds, with small quantities of bodies, skins, feathers, trophies and scientific specimens also reported through trade.

Cuora bourreti

Bourret’s box turtle

This species is endemic to central Vietnam and a few regions of Laos. This species is in high demand within the international pet trade and many food markets throughout Southeast Asia. The trade of its bones and shell have also been recorded for traditional medicinal purposes.

Cuora picturata

Southern Vietnam box turtle

This is an endemic species to Vietnam. It is in high demand within the international pet trade and many food markets throughout Asia. In addition, its shell is known to be used in international trade for medicinal purposes.

Geochelone elegans

Indian star tortoise

This species is a medium-sized tortoise endemic to parts of India. Numerically, it is the single-most seized species of tortoise. There is a high volume of this species within the international pet trade.

Lutrogale perspicillata

Smooth-coated otter

The smooth-coated otter, once common in the wetlands and low-lying areas of Southeast Asia, is now restricted to a few protected areas. The population has declined due in large part to exploitation for the global trade of otter skins and for use in the pet trade.

Malacochersus tornieri

Pancake tortoise

The pancake tortoise typically lives in rock crevices in dry savannah in parts of Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia. Due to its unique appearance and behaviour, with a flat and flexible shell that allows it to wedge into rock crevices, the species is highly desired in the international pet trade. Exploitation for commercial trade is considered to be a major threat to this species.

Mauremys annamensis

Annam pond turtle

This species is a medium-sized turtle and is endemic to Vietnam. Its primary threat is collection for trade. The species continues to be in demand within the international pet trade and throughout many Asian food markets.

Additions to CITES Appendix I – Implementation of Import and Export Controls (8 taxa)

Scientific name

Common name

Description

Achillides chikae hermeli

Mindoro peacock swallowtail

This endemic species to the island of Mindoro in the Philippines is a subspecies of the Appendix I–listed Papilio chikae chikae, and the two subspecies are difficult to distinguish. Easy to capture, this species is popular among collectors, naturalists and researchers.

Ceratophora erdeleni

Erdelen’s horn lizard

All species of this genus are endemic to Sri Lanka. They are a heavily targeted species in the international pet trade. It is the only known utilization and trade of the genus.

Ceratophora karu

Karunaratne’s horn lizard

Ceratophora tennentii

Leaf-nose lizard

Cophotis ceylanica

Pygmy lizard

Both of these species are endemic to Sri Lanka and occur only within restricted areas. Specimens are commonly captured in the wild for international pet trade.

Cophotis dumbara

Knuckles pygmy lizard

Gonatodes daudini

Union Island gecko

This species is a very small, colourful gecko endemic to Chatham Bay on Union Island in the Grenadines Archipelago. It was first described in 2005 and has since become heavily targeted by collectors for the live pet trade, especially in Europe and North America.

Parides burchellanus

Swallowtail butterfly

Endemic to Brazil, this species of butterfly is found only in five regions of the country. In terms of trade, it is commonly sold internationally through the internet. The number of specimens found in sales portals has historically increased, especially within the last few years, which represents a threat to the populations.

Additions to CITES Appendix II – Implementation of export controls (25 taxa)

Scientific name

Common name

Description

Cedrela spp.

(17 species are included in this taxon)

(with annotation #6 [populations of the Neotropics])

(entry into effect delayed by 12 months, i.e. until August 28, 2020)

Cedars (Spanish Cedars)

This genus has a wide distribution that extends from Mexico to Argentina. It is of enormous economic importance for the quality of the wood, which is known for its beauty, durability and pest resistance.

Ceratophora aspera

(zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes)

Rough-nosed horn lizard

This species of agamid lizard is found in the moist wetlands and sub-montane forests of southern Sri Lanka. This species is known to be collected and traded in many international markets for the pet trade.

Ceratophora stoddartii

(zero export quota for wild specimens for commercial purposes)

Rhino-horn lizard

This species of lizard in the Agamidae family is found widespread in montane forests of central Sri Lanka. This species is known to be collected and traded in many international markets for the pet trade.

Ctenosaura spp.

Spiny-tailed iguanas

This genus of iguana is found in hot and dry areas of Mexico and Central America. The populations of this species are declining due to hunting, loss of habitat and international pet trade.

Echinotriton chinhaiensis

Chinhai spiny newt

Both of these species are endemic to the province of Zhejiang in China. They are mainly threatened by habitat destruction. The E. chinhaiensis is in demand within the U.S. and EU pet trade due to their extreme rarity. Illegal hunting and international illegal trade have been recorded. With the high bid of E. chinhaiensis in the international pet trade, the attention and popularity of E. maxiquadratus are increasing. There is a high risk of illegal trade for this species.

Echinotriton maxiquadratus

Mountain spiny newt

Gekko gecko

Tokay gecko

This species is a large, colourful gecko with a wide distribution ranging from Southern China through southern and Southeast Asia. The species is used in Chinese traditional medicine and also kept as a pet. International trade of this species is extremely high.

Giraffa camelopardalis

Giraffe

This species is endemic to Africa and is threatened by habitat loss and illegal hunting for meat and hide. This species is known to be traded in many international markets for its parts (bones and skin).

Glaucostegus spp.

Guitarfish

This genus can be found in the eastern Atlantic and the northwestern Indian Ocean. This species is known to be traded in many international markets for their fins.

Goniurosaurus spp.

(except the species native to Japan)

Cave geckos

This genus is endemic to Southeastern and Eastern Asia. This species is popular in the international pet trade due to their beautiful appearance and striking colour patterns.

Lyriocephalus scutatus

Hump snout lizard

This lizard is endemic to Sri Lanka and is monotypic. Collection for the pet trade is common for this species, posing an additional threat to this species other than habitat loss.

Holothuria fuscogilva

(entry into effect delayed by 12 months, i.e. until August 28, 2020)

Teatfish (sea cucumber)

Distributed throughout parts of the Red Sea, the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean, these species are vulnerable to overexploitation as they are easily harvested in shallow water. This species is commonly traded as dried, refrigerated, frozen and salted products. They are used for food, biomedical research and traditional Chinese medicine as well as the pet trade.

Holothuria nobilis

(entry into effect delayed by 12 months, i.e. until August 28, 2020)

Holoturia whitmaei

(entry into effect delayed by 12 months, i.e. until August 28, 2020)

Isurus oxyrinchus

Shortfin mako

These species are highly migratory large-sized sharks that are distributed throughout mainly tropical waters. They are commonly caught as incidental take in other in commercial fisheries. However, it is an important species in sport fisheries in the Atlantic and Pacific regions. These species are harvested internationally for its meat and fins.

Isurus paucus

Longfin mako

Paramesotriton spp.

(13 species are included in this taxon)

Asian warty newts

Of the 13 species in this genus, 11 are endemic to China, one is endemic to Vietnam, one is found in both Vietnam and China. Wild populations are threatened by overexploitation for the international pet trade, and for domestic use for food and traditional medicine.

Paroedura androyensis

Grandidier’s Madagascar ground gecko

This gecko is endemic to southern Madagascar. It is commonly traded internationally through online pet trade websites at a level of trade that poses a threat to the species.

Poecilotheria spp.

(15 species are included in this taxon)

Ornamental spiders

Eight species of this genus are endemic to India, five are endemic to Sri Lanka, and two can be found in both countries. The genus is very popular in the pet trade due to their coloration and size.

Pseudocerastes urarachnoides

Spider-tailed viper

This viper is known to only be found in two provinces in western Iran. It uses its spider-shaped tail to attract birds for prey. There is rumoured use of it in the pet trade, and collection for pet trade has already resulted in local extinction of some populations of the other two species of the Pseudocerastes genus.

Pterocarpus tinctorius

(with annotation #6)

Bloodwood (rosewood species)

The bloodwood is a rosewood species native to a range of habitats across eastern and southern Africa. The past few years have seen a dramatic increase in harvest and export as its lumber is heavily desired for its quality.

Rhinidae spp.

(10 species are included in this taxon)

Wedgefish

Most of the species within this family are endemic to the Indo-Pacific region; both are found in coastal inshore habitats in East Africa and the Persian Gulf, with the range of Rhynchobatus australiae extending into Southeast Asia and Oceania, as far into the Pacific as Fiji. The primary threat to this family is unsustainable and unregulated fishing. This species is caught by artisanal and commercial fisheries both as a target species and as bycatch due to the very high value of their fins on the international market.

Syrmaticus reevesii

Reeves’s pheasant

This species of long-tailed pheasant is endemic to central China. The population has decreased in recent decades due to illegal hunting and habitat destruction. The Reeves’s Pheasant is threatened by poaching for food by local communities. The main purposes for international trade are fashion decoration and specimen display.

Tylototriton spp.

(25 species are included in this taxon)

Crocodile newts

This genus has a restricted distribution range throughout the countries of China, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar, India, Nepal and Bhutan. In addition to habitat loss, species are harvested from the wild as a food source, for use in traditional medicine and to supply international pet markets.

Widdringtonia whytei

Mulanje cedar

This highly valued species is the national tree of Malawi. After years of exploitation from unsustainable and illegal logging, invasive competing tree species, aphid infestation, and low rates of regeneration, a population survey in 2018 found not a single standing reproductively mature tree. This species is highly desired for commercial purposes due to the quality of its lumber.

#6 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets and plywood.

Additions to CITES Appendix III – Implementation of export controls (2 taxa)

Scientific name

Common name

Description

Anolis spp.

(9 species are included in this taxon)

(requested by Cuba)

Anoles

Anolis is a species-rich genus of anoles, iguanian lizards that are native to the Americas. Many species within the genus Anolis are targeted for international pet trade markets.

Sphaerodactylus spp.

(15 species are included in this taxon)

(requested by Cuba)

Ball finger geckos

Sphaerodactylus is a genus of gecko endemic to the Americas. They are commonly distinguished from other geckos by their small size. Some species within the genus are occasionally targeted for the pet trade.

Deletion from CITES Appendix III – Removal of export controls (6 taxa)

Scientific name

Common name

Description

Galictis vittata

(requested by Costa Rica)

Greater grison

The greater grison is a species of mustelid that is endemic to Southern Mexico, Central and South America. They inhabit a wide range of tropical forest habitats and are threatened by logging practices and human capture. They are one of the most confiscated species in Colombia.

Bassaricyon gabbii (requested by Costa Rica)

Bushy-tailed olingo

This species is a tree-dwelling member of the family Procyonidae native to the montane and tropical moist forests of Central America. This species is most threatened by deforestation.

Cabassous centralis

(requested by Costa Rica)

Northern naked-tailed armadillo

The northern naked-tailed armadillo is a species of armadillo native to Central and northern South America. This species is mainly threatened by hunting practices and the impacts of urbanization to its habitat.

Choloepus hoffmanni

(requested by Costa Rica)

Hoffmann’s two-toed sloth

Hoffmann’s two-toed sloth is a species of sloth native to the deciduous forests and rainforests of Central and South America. This species is mainly threatened locally by severe habitat degradation, subsistence hunting, and the pet trade.

Sciurus deppei

(requested by Costa Rica)

Deppe’s squirrel

This species of tree squirrel is native to the damp tropical forests of Central America. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species, there are no known major threats to this species.

Crax rubra

(requested by Costa Rica only for the population of Costa Rica)

Great curassow

The great curassow is a large, pheasant-like bird from the Neotropical rainforests of Central and northern South America. This species is mainly threatened by ongoing habitat loss and overhunting.

Annotation Updates (6 taxa)

Scientific name

Common name

Description

Adansonia grandidieri

Grandidier’s baobab, bottletree

Annotation #16 for the species was amended as follows: "Seeds, fruits and oils."

Aloe ferox

Bitter aloe, cape aloe, lucid aloe, rap aloe

Annotation #4 for the species was amended as follows (in accordance with Notification No. 2019/052, page 7):

"All parts and derivatives except the following:

  • (a) seeds (including seedpods of Orchidaceae), spores and pollen (including pollinia); this exemption does not apply to seeds from Cactaceae spp. exported from Mexico, and to seeds from Beccariophoenix madagascariensis and Dypsis decaryi exported from Madagascar;
  • (b) seedling or tissue cultures obtained in vitro, in solid or liquid media, transported in sterile containers;
  • (c) cut flowers of artificially propagated plants;
  • (d) fruits and their parts and derivatives of naturalized or artificially propagated plants of the genus Vanilla (Orchidaceae) and of the family Cactaceae;
  • (e) stems and flowers, and their parts and derivatives, of naturalized or artificially propagated plants of the genera Opuntia subgenus Opuntia and Selenicereus (Cactaceae); and
  • (f) finished products of Aloe ferox and Euphorbia antisyphilitica, packaged and ready for retail trade."

Dalbergia spp.

(over 300 species are included in this taxon)

Rosewoods

Annotation #15 for the taxa above was amended as follows:

"All parts and derivatives except the following:

  • (a) leaves, flowers, pollen, fruits, and seeds;
  • (b) finished products to a maximum weight of wood of the listed species of up to 10 kg per shipment …;
  • (c) finished musical instruments, finished musical instrument parts and finished musical instrument accessories;
  • (d) parts and derivatives of Dalbergia cochinchinensis, which are covered by annotation #4; and
  • (e) parts and derivatives of Dalbergia spp. originating and exported from Mexico, which are covered by annotation #6.

Guibourtia demeusei

Bubinga, African rosewood

Guibourtia pellegriniana

Guibourtia tessmannii

Pericopsis elata

African teak

Annotation #17 (to replace annotation #5) was added to the species as follows: "Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets, plywood and transformed wood."

Vicugna vicugna

(population of Chile)

Vicuña

The name of the population of Chile was amended from "population of the Primera Region" to "populations of the region of Tarapacá and of the region of Arica and Parinacota."

Saiga borealis

Mongolian saiga

The annotation "a zero export quota for wild specimens traded for commercial purposes" was included.

Saiga tatarica

Saiga antelope

#4 All parts and derivatives except the following:

#5 Logs, sawn wood and veneer sheets.

#6 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets and plywood.

#15 All parts and derivatives except the following:

#16 Seeds, fruits and oils.

#17 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets, plywood and transformed wood.